In a perfect world, the answer to the question “should someone with diabetes take steroids?” would be a simple “no”. Of course, not only do we not live in a perfect world, there are also few simple answers for diabetics. Steroids can play havoc with blood sugar levels, but they can also be the best choice in treating some very serious conditions. So, perhaps the better answer would be “maybe” with the added caveat of making sure you are aware of the consequences and prepared to be proactive in managing them.   (more…)
Māori Health Services at Tauranga and Whakatāne hospitals delivers health initiatives under the philosophy of Tangata Whenua Realities, Ngā Pou Mana o Io. The health model of Mana Atua, Mana Tūpuna, Mana Whenua, Mana Tangata, operates alongside clinical and rehabilitation services, Mental Health & Addiction Services and Regional Community Services.

We summarised the primary and secondary outcomes using descriptive statistics at each scheduled visit. A random effects mixed model was used to evaluate the effect of intervention on HbA1c at three, six, and nine months’ follow-up, adjusting for baseline HbA1c and stratification factors and accounting for repeated measures over time. Model adjusted mean differences in HbA1c between the two groups were estimated at each visit, by including an interaction term between treatment and month. Missing data on the primary outcome were taken into account in modelling based on the missing at random assumption. Both 95% confidence intervals and P values were reported. Treatment effects sizes were also compared between important subgroups considered in stratification, including diabetes type (1 and 2), ethnicity (Māori/Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific), and region (urban and rural). For other secondary outcomes measured at nine months, we used generalised linear regression models with same covariate adjustment using a link function appropriate to the distribution of outcomes. Model adjusted estimates on the treatment difference between the two groups at nine months were reported, together with 95% confidence intervals and P values. No imputation was considered on secondary outcomes.

There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)
A large patient sample size was obtained by contacting all patients seen in the last 12 months with an email address. The risk of overrepresentation by more technology-literate responders through recruitment via email was minimized by also recruiting via telephone and by providing paper surveys at the HPs’ conference. The demographic and clinical data of responders and non-responders were compared, and most variables showed no difference. Responders were actually older than non-responders and had better glycemic control. This study focused on the beliefs and opinions of people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers) rather than simply describing apps for diabetes . It is one of the first papers to describe app use in people with diabetes in New Zealand.

Phoenix Health Centre carries out pre employment medical assessments for several large employers in Whakatane. These give a base line recording of an employee’s health status at the time they were employed. It is then possible to monitor the employee’s health in relation to the hazards they may be exposed to in the workplace. If required we also undertake monitored urine sampling for ESR drug testing.
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