The A1C is a common blood test that measures the amount of glucose that is attached to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. It has a variety of other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1 and is used in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Unlike the traditional blood glucose test, the A1C does not require fasting, and blood can be drawn at any time of day. It is hoped that this will result in more people getting tested and decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes, which is currently estimated to be more than 7 million adults in the U.S. (more…)

We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)


There are three forms of the disease. People with Type 1 Diabetes typically make none of their own insulin and therefore require insulin injections for survival. People with Type 2 Diabetes, the form that comprises the majority of all cases, usually produce their own insulin, but not enough or they are unable to use it properly. Then there is Gestational Diabetes; globally, 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes. While maternal blood glucose levels usually return to normal after the baby is born, there is an increased risk of both mother and child developing Type 2 Diabetes later in life.
Another goal of this blog is to give you a behind-the-scenes look at what the Association does on a daily basis to fulfill its mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people living with diabetes.  Our staff’s dedication – combined the stories that provide them with inspiration through the day – is a critical part of the Stop Diabetes movement.
Having a healthy lifestyle includes daily physical activity which can prevent or delay Type 2 Diabetes. There are plenty of organised activities you can take part in such as Walk to Work, but you can also do your own thing and get moving with family and friends in any way you like. It’s most important to remember that activity is for life, not just one day. Regular physical activity could include walking, riding a bike, dancing or swimming.
Diabetes Depot carries a full line insulin pump supplies, including all major insulin infusions sets, insulin reservoirs and cartridges available in Canada, all at significant discounts below the manufacturer's list price. Our product line of diabetic supplies, required daily by people living with diabetes, include blood glucose meters, glucose test strips, lancets, insulin pen needles, insulin products, Dex-4 glucose tablets and Emla anesthetic cream. We also carry accessories such as pump clips, pump cases & pouches, prep pads, battery caps, diabetic socks, and helpful books on diabetes… everything an insulin pump user would require. Plus, because the Diabetes Depot is located within Stutt's Pharmacy, we also offer a complete prescription service.
Cost effectiveness as well as healthcare use was assessed during the study period compared with the nine months before randomisation (presented separately). We measured patient engagement and satisfaction with the intervention using semistructured interviews and data from the content management system. The secondary outcomes health related quality of life and perceived social support were not included in the initial trial registration but added before commencing the trial.

Your health professional at the Centre may suggest that they make a referral for you, if there are problems affecting your diabetes management or your overall health and management. Alternatively you can ask your family doctor or nurse to refer you. If you are uncertain about whether it would be helpful to see us, you are most welcome to phone us directly to discuss this. Phone 3640 860 ext 89113.

Some of the most vocal diabetes stories come from blogs and other social media platforms which create a broad online community of people who have diabetes or whose loved ones are living with the disease.  “By means of this blog,” noted Hausner, “we hope to add our voice to this dialogue and further engage with those who may be well aware of the effects diabetes can have on their lives.”
New Zealand Europeans had a significantly higher incidence rate than Non-Europeans, which is consistent with other studies [21], [22]. There was a marked decrease in the proportion of Europeans in Auckland over the study period, so that the increase in type 1 diabetes incidence was not due to a shift in ethnic distribution. Furthermore, the incidence has been increasing in both Europeans and non-Europeans. A number of studies have shown that immigrant groups display higher rates of type 1 diabetes than in their countries of origin, particularly those that move into societies with a westernised lifestyle [23], [24]. For example, although type 1 diabetes in Polynesia is extremely rare, an abrupt increase in incidence occurs in Pacific Island peoples who migrate to New Zealand [25]. Our study provides evidence that the factors leading to an increase in incidence are operating across all ethnicities. Indeed, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has been remarkably similar over time for the indigenous Maori and the largely newly immigrant Pacific Island and Other ethnic groups.

-Learn to eat well-balanced meals that include healthful food choices (vegetables, fruits, whole grains, etc.) and watch your portion sizes. Even foods that are good for you can add pounds to your waistline, if you consume too much of them. Losing those extra pounds will help you manage not only your diabetes, but also other health problems you may have.
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