Type 2 Diabetes is one of the major consequences of the obesity epidemic and according to Diabetes New Zealand is New Zealand’s fastest-growing health crisis. In terms of diabetes diagnosis, Type 2 currently accounts for around 90% of all cases. Also of concern to health professionals is that there are large numbers of people with silent, undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes which may be damaging their bodies. An estimated 258,000 New Zealanders are estimated to have some form of diabetes, with than number doubling over the past decade.
Having a healthy lifestyle includes daily physical activity which can prevent or delay Type 2 Diabetes. There are plenty of organised activities you can take part in such as Walk to Work, but you can also do your own thing and get moving with family and friends in any way you like. It’s most important to remember that activity is for life, not just one day. Regular physical activity could include walking, riding a bike, dancing or swimming.
To assess whether changes in incidence were more marked in certain age groups (as observed overseas [3], [4]), patients were also categorised into three bands according to age at diagnosis: 0–4 yr (children less than 5 yr), 5–9 yr (equal or greater than 5 yr but less than 10 yr), and 10–14 yr (equal or greater than 10 yr but less than 15 yr). These age bands also match national census classifications. The incidence of type 1 diabetes was assessed as the number of new diagnoses per 100,000 age-matched inhabitants on a given year, based on the 5-yearly national census data from Statistics New Zealand [12] and interpolated estimates of the population for the intervening years. Incidence was modelled using the Poisson distribution. Point estimates were calculated with exact Poisson confidence limits, and change in incidence over time were analysed using Poisson regression. Changes in patient numbers, age at diagnosis, and anthropometric data over time were assessed by linear regression. Poisson modelling was undertaken using StatsDirect v2.7.8 (StatsDirect Ltd, UK); other analyses were undertaken using JMP v. 5.1 (SAS Inc, USA).
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The 60.2% of HPs in our survey who had recommended a diabetes app is significantly higher than previously documented amongst physicians across a range of specialties [28], although it is similar to HPs’ recommendation for any type of health app [19]. We did not observe any effect of HPs’ age on app recommendation, although it is previously well established that younger HPs are more likely to adopt mHealth for diabetes [28].
Wednesday Walks are a joint venture between Korowhai Aroha Health Centre and Diabetes NZ Rotorua Branch. Join Mary every Wednesday morning for some gentle exercise in good company. The idea is to have fun and encourage each other to exercise. Our Wednesday Walks set out from the Waka on the Lakefront at 9am sharp. The walk lasts for up to an hour. You can go at your own pace and there is no minimum level of fitness required. Wear a hat and bring walking shoes, water & extra carbohydrate foods if you are prone to low blood sugar levels. Bring your partner, friend, kids or mokopuna.
Lack of insulin results in ketoacidosis. Ketones are acids that develop in the blood and appear in the urine. Ketones could poison the body and this is a warning sign that the diabetes is out of control. Symptoms of diabetes involve nausea, shortness of breath, vomiting, fruity flavor in breath, dry mouth, and high glucose levels. Complications associated with diabetes are retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, heart disease and gangrene. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is yet another problem associated with diabetes mellitus. Symptoms include hunger, tremor, seizure, sweating, dizziness, jerks, tingling sensation and pale skin color. Improper management of diabetes causes low blood sugar, which in turn causes hypoglycemic coma. It is a life threatening condition.
Another goal of this blog is to give you a behind-the-scenes look at what the Association does on a daily basis to fulfill its mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people living with diabetes.  Our staff’s dedication – combined the stories that provide them with inspiration through the day – is a critical part of the Stop Diabetes movement.
In relation to perceptions and beliefs about diabetes, a significant reduction in illness identity (how much patients experience diabetes related symptoms) on the BIPQ was observed in favour of the intervention (adjusted mean difference −0.54 (95% confidence interval −1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). However, we saw no significant group differences for perceptions of consequences, timeline, control, concern, emotions, and illness comprehensibility. A significant improvement in health status on the EQ-5D VAS was observed in favour of the intervention (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03) but no significant differences were observed between groups for the quality of life index score. Finally, the measure of perceived support for diabetes management showed a significant improvement between the groups in how supported the participants felt in relation to their diabetes management overall (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03) but no significant group differences on appraisal, emotional, and informational support.
Eligible participants were randomised to either an intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. Randomisation was stratified by health district category (high urban or high rural/remote), diabetes type (1 or 2), and ethnicity (Māori and Pacific, or non-Māori/non-Pacific). The randomisation sequence was generated by computer programme using variable block sizes of two or four, and overseen by the study statistician. Following participant consent and completion of the baseline interview, the research assistant then randomised the participant to intervention or control, using the REDCap randomisation module. The REDCap randomisation module ensured that treatment allocation was concealed until the point of randomisation. Due to the nature of the intervention, participants were aware of their treatment allocation. Research assistants conducting the phone interviews were also aware of the treatment allocation. However, the objective primary outcome was measured by blinded assessors throughout the study period.
Funding: The development of SMS4BG was funded by Waitemata District Health Board. The randomised controlled trial was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand in partnership with the Waitemata District Health Board and Auckland District Health Board (through the Research Partnerships for New Zealand Health Delivery initiative), and the New Zealand Ministry of Health. The funders were not involved in any way in the preparation of the manuscript or analysis of the study results. No payment has been received for writing this publication.
We’ll also teach you what to do with everything you’re learning. Using the latest research and stories from people with diabetes, we’ll help you make small changes through short videos and simple action items. Soon, you’ll be seeing results, feeling better and having more energy. Many people with diabetes say that they’re healthier NOW than they were before they were diagnosed– you can be one of them!
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