The American Diabetes Association launched its first official blog today to help put a face on a disease that kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.  The blog, called Diabetes Stops Here: Living with Diabetes; Inspired to Stop It, aims to document the Stop Diabetes® movement by reaching and engaging the 23.6 million Americans living with diabetes as well as the 57 million who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. 
A total of 793 individuals were referred to the study and assessed for eligibility between June 2015 and November 2016. Of these, 366 were randomised to the intervention and control groups (n=183 each; fig 1). The final nine month follow-up assessments were completed in August 2017, with loss to follow-up (that is, no follow-up data on any outcome) low in both groups (overall 7/366=2%). A total of 12 participants (six per group) were excluded from the primary outcome analysis because of no follow-up HbA1c results after randomisation. Baseline characteristics of participants are presented in table 1, and no adverse events were recorded from the study or protocol deviations.

Most people know that diabetes involves the inability to control glucose, or blood sugar, by not producing enough insulin or not managing it correctly. This leads to elevated levels of glucose in the body, which can result in very serious complications, such as heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, hardening of the arteries, foot and leg amputation and blindness. (more…)
The annual incidence of type 1 diabetes in children <15 yr in the Auckland population in 1990–2009 was 16.4/100,000 (95% CI 15.3–17.5). Considering the underlying 36% population growth over the 1990–2009 period, there was still a progressive increase in the incidence of new cases (p<0.0001; Figure 1A). By Poisson regression the type 1 diabetes incidence in children <15 yr in 2009 was 22.5 per 100,000 (95% CI 17.5–28.4), in comparison to 10.9 per 100,000 in 1990 (95% CI 7.0–16.1) (Figure 1A). Overall incidence among males and females across the 20-year period was similar (p = 0.49). The increase in incidence was greatest among children 10–14 yr (average increase of +0.81/year; p<0.0001) and lowest among children 0–4 yr (+0.32/year; p = 0.02); incidences by 2009 were 27.0 (95% CI 18.1–38.8) for children 10–14 yr, 25.4 (95% CI 16.5–37.3; +0.66/year; p = 0.0002) for children 5–9 yr, and 14.9 per 100,000 (95% CI 8.4–24.5) for those aged 0–4 yr (Figure 1B).
Blood glucose tracking is the most common feature of diabetes apps [5,14], with other features including record of medications, dietary advice, and tracking, such as carbohydrate content calculation, and weight management support [5,11,12,14-16]. Additionally some apps recommend insulin dosing based on users inputs of glucose levels and estimated meal carbohydrate. Meta-analysis of 22 trials including 1657 patients in which use of mobile phone apps supporting diabetes management was compared to usual care or other Web-based supports showed that app use led to a mean reduction in HbA1c of 6mmol/mol that is 0.5% [9]. This compares favorably with the glucose lowering of lifestyle change, namely diet [17] and oral diabetes medication [18].
Type 2 Diabetes is one of the major consequences of the obesity epidemic and according to Diabetes New Zealand is New Zealand’s fastest-growing health crisis. In terms of diabetes diagnosis, Type 2 currently accounts for around 90% of all cases. Also of concern to health professionals is that there are large numbers of people with silent, undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes which may be damaging their bodies. An estimated 258,000 New Zealanders are estimated to have some form of diabetes, with than number doubling over the past decade.
The look of the Dario appealed straight away to me. Small and compact. Easy for me to carry with my phone which goes everywhere with me. Love the fantastic app on my phone. Clear, informative and easy to use. Love it! I can look back at previous readings to see any patterns. Sara and Assaf have been brilliant at helping out with any issues I have come across, which I thank them hugely for. The Dario Lounge is a great community for all users, who all share advice.
We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)
Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which is accompanied by high blood glucose levels. It is a result of improper functioning of the pancreas, which secretes the insulin hormone. Lack of insulin, result in ketoacidosis. Makhana or Fox nut is a sweet and sour seed, which is also known as Euryale ferox. These seeds contain starch and ten percent of protein. There is no supporting literature for its positive association with diabetes. Therapeutic effects of fox nut involve its strengthening of kidney. It also helps to relieve the dampness, associated with leucorrhoea. It also regulates hypertension or high blood pressure. It is also beneficial for individuals with impotence and arthritis. Fox nuts are effective for individuals with high risk of premature ageing. It is also known as gorgon nut, is also helpful.
Interventions The intervention group received a tailored package of text messages for up to nine months in addition to usual care. Text messages provided information, support, motivation, and reminders related to diabetes self management and lifestyle behaviours. The control group received usual care. Messages were delivered by a specifically designed automated content management system.

It’s heart-wrenching to watch all that people go through as natural disasters play out on our television screens. Tucked away, along with sympathy for those in the midst of a hurricane, earthquake, flood or other catastrophic events, is the very understandable thought, “I’m so glad that’s not happening to me!”. The truth is, however, that we are all susceptible to major life-changing events, and they can happen with very little notice. Those with a chronic medical condition, like diabetes, are especially vulnerable and should take seriously the advice to be prepared.    (more…)
The annual incidence of type 1 diabetes in children <15 yr in the Auckland population in 1990–2009 was 16.4/100,000 (95% CI 15.3–17.5). Considering the underlying 36% population growth over the 1990–2009 period, there was still a progressive increase in the incidence of new cases (p<0.0001; Figure 1A). By Poisson regression the type 1 diabetes incidence in children <15 yr in 2009 was 22.5 per 100,000 (95% CI 17.5–28.4), in comparison to 10.9 per 100,000 in 1990 (95% CI 7.0–16.1) (Figure 1A). Overall incidence among males and females across the 20-year period was similar (p = 0.49). The increase in incidence was greatest among children 10–14 yr (average increase of +0.81/year; p<0.0001) and lowest among children 0–4 yr (+0.32/year; p = 0.02); incidences by 2009 were 27.0 (95% CI 18.1–38.8) for children 10–14 yr, 25.4 (95% CI 16.5–37.3; +0.66/year; p = 0.0002) for children 5–9 yr, and 14.9 per 100,000 (95% CI 8.4–24.5) for those aged 0–4 yr (Figure 1B).
Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which is accompanied by high blood glucose levels. It is a result of improper functioning of the pancreas, which secretes the insulin hormone. Lack of insulin, result in ketoacidosis. Makhana or Fox nut is a sweet and sour seed, which is also known as Euryale ferox. These seeds contain starch and ten percent of protein. There is no supporting literature for its positive association with diabetes. Therapeutic effects of fox nut involve its strengthening of kidney. It also helps to relieve the dampness, associated with leucorrhoea. It also regulates hypertension or high blood pressure. It is also beneficial for individuals with impotence and arthritis. Fox nuts are effective for individuals with high risk of premature ageing. It is also known as gorgon nut, is also helpful.
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