“There have been so many touching moments in the movement to Stop Diabetes since we launched last year,” commented Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “People have shared courageous stories of facing their diabetes head on, while others have shared their heart-breaking experiences of losing a loved one because of diabetes. The blog is a new way to raise our collective voices and tell people why we need to Stop Diabetes once and for all.”  
The World Health Organisation (WHO) has mandated November 14 as World Diabetes Day, an international event to raise awareness about diabetes. Close to 350 million people in the world have diabetes and WHO reports that a person dies from this disease every 6 seconds – that’s 5 million deaths. Currently 1 in 11 adults have diabetes worldwide and this is predicted to increase to 1 adult in 10 (652 million) by 2040. Sobering statistics indeed.
Height and weight were recorded for 660 patients at their required first post-diagnostic clinic (on average 15 weeks from diagnosis) from 1994 onwards. Annual mean BMI SDS of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes did not alter (average non-significant change smaller than ±0.02 SDS/year) over the period for the entire population, or for any gender, age, or ethnicity sub-group. There was no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis.
The A1C is a common blood test that measures the amount of glucose that is attached to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. It has a variety of other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1 and is used in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Unlike the traditional blood glucose test, the A1C does not require fasting, and blood can be drawn at any time of day. It is hoped that this will result in more people getting tested and decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes, which is currently estimated to be more than 7 million adults in the U.S. (more…)
Ethnicity was recorded by self-report using a prioritised system, such that if multiple ethnicities were selected, the patient was assigned to a single category, following a hierarchical system of classification [18]. Patients were assigned to European, Maori, Pacific Islander, or Other (Asian/Middle Eastern/Latin American/African) groups, which match national census classifications.
Statistical analyses were performed by SAS version 9.4 (SAS Institute). All statistical tests were two sided at a 5% significance level. Analyses were performed on the principle of intention to treat, including all randomised participants who provided at least one valid measure on the primary outcome after randomisation. Demographics and baseline characteristics of all participants were first summarised by treatment group with descriptive statistics. No formal statistical tests were conducted at baseline, because any baseline imbalance observed between two groups could have occurred by chance with randomisation.
In a perfect world, the answer to the question “should someone with diabetes take steroids?” would be a simple “no”. Of course, not only do we not live in a perfect world, there are also few simple answers for diabetics. Steroids can play havoc with blood sugar levels, but they can also be the best choice in treating some very serious conditions. So, perhaps the better answer would be “maybe” with the added caveat of making sure you are aware of the consequences and prepared to be proactive in managing them.   (more…)
In relation to perceptions and beliefs about diabetes, a significant reduction in illness identity (how much patients experience diabetes related symptoms) on the BIPQ was observed in favour of the intervention (adjusted mean difference −0.54 (95% confidence interval −1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). However, we saw no significant group differences for perceptions of consequences, timeline, control, concern, emotions, and illness comprehensibility. A significant improvement in health status on the EQ-5D VAS was observed in favour of the intervention (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03) but no significant differences were observed between groups for the quality of life index score. Finally, the measure of perceived support for diabetes management showed a significant improvement between the groups in how supported the participants felt in relation to their diabetes management overall (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03) but no significant group differences on appraisal, emotional, and informational support.
The incidence of type 1 diabetes was higher in New Zealand Europeans than other ethnic groups throughout the study period (Figure 2, p<0.0001). There was little difference in incidence among non-European ethnic groups. The annual incidences (per 100,000) by 2009 were: Europeans 32.5 (95% CI 23.8–43.3), Non-Europeans 14.4 (95% CI 9.2–21.4), Maori 13.9 (95% CI 5.2–29.7), Pacific Islanders 15.4 (95% CI 7.3–28.5), and Other 13.5 (95% CI 5.8–26.8). The rate of increase in incidence over the study period was very similar across all ethnicities, as illustrated by the slopes in Figure 2. However, while the average increase in incidence was higher for Europeans than Non-Europeans in children of all age groups (Table 1), the increase was proportionally lower in Europeans (2-fold) than Non-Europeans (3-fold) due to a lower baseline incidence in the latter group (Figure 2). Nonetheless, in both ethnic groups type 1 diabetes incidence in children 10–14 yr increased at a higher rate than in the youngest 0–4 yr group, with a >2-fold difference observed among both Europeans and Non-Europeans (Table 1). Age at diagnosis across the study period was similar in both ethnic groups (p = 0.47).
This study found that a tailored, theoretically based, SMS based, diabetes self management support programme led to modest improvements in glycaemic control. The effects of intervention were also seen in four of 21 secondary outcomes, including foot care behaviour and ratings of diabetes support. The programme showed a high level of acceptability with the overwhelming majority of participants finding the intervention useful and willing to recommend it to others.
Ethnicity was recorded by self-report using a prioritised system, such that if multiple ethnicities were selected, the patient was assigned to a single category, following a hierarchical system of classification [18]. Patients were assigned to European, Maori, Pacific Islander, or Other (Asian/Middle Eastern/Latin American/African) groups, which match national census classifications.
In relation to perceptions and beliefs about diabetes, a significant reduction in illness identity (how much patients experience diabetes related symptoms) on the BIPQ was observed in favour of the intervention (adjusted mean difference −0.54 (95% confidence interval −1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). However, we saw no significant group differences for perceptions of consequences, timeline, control, concern, emotions, and illness comprehensibility. A significant improvement in health status on the EQ-5D VAS was observed in favour of the intervention (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03) but no significant differences were observed between groups for the quality of life index score. Finally, the measure of perceived support for diabetes management showed a significant improvement between the groups in how supported the participants felt in relation to their diabetes management overall (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03) but no significant group differences on appraisal, emotional, and informational support.
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
HOME What is Diabetes What is diabetes? TYPE 1 DIABETES TYPE 2 DIABETES Get Tested for Diabetes Gestational Diabetes ARE YOU AT RISK? COMPLICATIONS YOUTH Resources for Youth #1 Pack and Jerry The Bear Study & Exams Type 1 diabetes newly diganosed packs LIVING WELL LIVING WELL WITH DIABETES Type 1 Diabetes Day to Day Management Type 2 Diabetes Day to Day Management Managing Diabetes Food and Nutrition ANNUAL DIABETES Check ups Travelling to New Zealand RESOURCES RESOURCES Take Control Toolkit Take Control Toolkit APP PAMPHLET ORDERING Diabetes Wellness Magazine Your Stories NEWS AND EVENTS Blog WHO ARE WE WHO IS DIABETES NZ Policies & Constitutions Diabetes NZ Awards Diabetes NZ Team CONTACT US Contact Info JOIN US PLEASE DONATE BRANCHES
×