The features most frequently used by current app users were blood glucose diaries (87%, 32/37), followed by carbohydrate/meal diaries (38%, 14/37) with 22% (8/37) reporting insulin dose calculation devices to be useful (Table 3). Table 3 demonstrates the features app users found useful in their current apps. App users reported the most desired feature for future use in an app was an insulin dose calculator (46%, 17/37; Table 4). Table 5 shows that non-app users reported insulin dose calculators to be the third most desired feature (54.6%, n=83/152). Blood glucose diaries were the most desired app feature amongst non-app users (64.4%, 98/152; Table 5). Non app users with T1DM were more likely to desire an insulin dose calculation device, than non-app users with T2DM, P=.01).
Funding: The development of SMS4BG was funded by Waitemata District Health Board. The randomised controlled trial was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand in partnership with the Waitemata District Health Board and Auckland District Health Board (through the Research Partnerships for New Zealand Health Delivery initiative), and the New Zealand Ministry of Health. The funders were not involved in any way in the preparation of the manuscript or analysis of the study results. No payment has been received for writing this publication.
-Learn to eat well-balanced meals that include healthful food choices (vegetables, fruits, whole grains, etc.) and watch your portion sizes. Even foods that are good for you can add pounds to your waistline, if you consume too much of them. Losing those extra pounds will help you manage not only your diabetes, but also other health problems you may have.

Wednesday Walks are a joint venture between Korowhai Aroha Health Centre and Diabetes NZ Rotorua Branch. Join Mary every Wednesday morning for some gentle exercise in good company. The idea is to have fun and encourage each other to exercise. Our Wednesday Walks set out from the Waka on the Lakefront at 9am sharp. The walk lasts for up to an hour. You can go at your own pace and there is no minimum level of fitness required. Wear a hat and bring walking shoes, water & extra carbohydrate foods if you are prone to low blood sugar levels. Bring your partner, friend, kids or mokopuna. 

Among the intervention participants, 169 (92%) completed questions at follow-up about satisfaction and acceptability of the intervention (table 5). Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with SMS4BG, and all but two participants thought that text messaging was a good way to deliver this type of support. Ten participants reported technical issues while receiving the intervention, most commonly issues replying to the messages (n=4), issues accessing graphs (n=2), and mobile reception issues (n=2).
Height and weight were recorded for 660 patients at their required first post-diagnostic clinic (on average 15 weeks from diagnosis) from 1994 onwards. Annual mean BMI SDS of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes did not alter (average non-significant change smaller than ±0.02 SDS/year) over the period for the entire population, or for any gender, age, or ethnicity sub-group. There was no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis.
For example, adjusting to having diabetes; difficulty in making the life changes necessary to stay well; difficulty managing anger, conflict and other emotions related to your health; depression, sadness and grief; anxiety, worries, panic and phobias related to your health; eating difficulties; and difficulty with coping with the complications of diabetes.
‘I was very pleased to contact your service. I was feeling overwhelmed with my current situation however knew that I needed to get a diabetes test done. While I was waiting for my turn to be tested Susan welcomed me, helped my overwhelming feelings calm down, she was very approachable and understanding. Sandy followed through by assisting me with assurance that things were going to be okay and was very understanding. She encouraged that I seek more medical advice for my blood pressure results. She phoned my manager and found me a local GP that I could visit right away. I was very appreciative of these ladies and all the help, care and advice they gave me. Thank you so much!’

In the U.S., there are nearly 26 million people living with diabetes, and more seniors have diabetes than any other age group. Currently, one in four Americans (10.9 million, or 26.9 percent) over the age of 60 is living with diabetes. With age comes an increased risk for specific complications that require diligence and care to properly mitigate them.


Today’s first post is titled “Why ‘Stop Diabetes’?” can be found at www.diabetesstopshere.org. This initial post seeks to explain why the Stop Diabetes movement was created and its goal for engaging the public.  “The goal of the Stop Diabetes movement is to grow to epic proportions, to be bigger than the disease itself,” the blog explains. “In short, it’s the answer to why the Association does the work that it does.”
It’s heart-wrenching to watch all that people go through as natural disasters play out on our television screens. Tucked away, along with sympathy for those in the midst of a hurricane, earthquake, flood or other catastrophic events, is the very understandable thought, “I’m so glad that’s not happening to me!”. The truth is, however, that we are all susceptible to major life-changing events, and they can happen with very little notice. Those with a chronic medical condition, like diabetes, are especially vulnerable and should take seriously the advice to be prepared.    (more…)
This study showed that a tailored and automated SMS self management support programme has potential for improving glycaemic control in adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Although the clinical significance of these results is unclear, and the full duration of these effects is yet to be determined, exploration of SMS4BG to supplement current practice is warranted.
Interventions The intervention group received a tailored package of text messages for up to nine months in addition to usual care. Text messages provided information, support, motivation, and reminders related to diabetes self management and lifestyle behaviours. The control group received usual care. Messages were delivered by a specifically designed automated content management system.
Funding: The development of SMS4BG was funded by Waitemata District Health Board. The randomised controlled trial was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand in partnership with the Waitemata District Health Board and Auckland District Health Board (through the Research Partnerships for New Zealand Health Delivery initiative), and the New Zealand Ministry of Health. The funders were not involved in any way in the preparation of the manuscript or analysis of the study results. No payment has been received for writing this publication.
We are now operating as a Branch of Diabetes New Zealand; previously we had been in operation for more than 30 years, as an independent Incorporated Society. During that time, we have seen some significant changes in the field of diabetes. As times change, we strive to change with them, but our basic mission remains the same: to support the interests of people living with diabetes in the Rotorua region.
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