Mobile phone ownership rates are increasing. Similar to trends seen in the United States and Canada, where mobile phone ownership is 72% and 67%, respectively [20], 70% of New Zealanders own a mobile phone, making diabetes apps potentially available to most people [21]. Limited research exists into the use of diabetes apps in New Zealand. However with increasing rates of both diabetes prevalence and mobile phone ownership, access to safe apps is essential for both HPs as potential app prescribers and patients as app users [21,22]. In Scotland, a survey of people with diabetes found high mobile phone ownership (67%) with over half reporting an interest in using apps for self-management of diabetes, but app usage in only 7% of responders [23]. The objectives of this study were (1) To establish whether people with diabetes use apps to assist with diabetes self-management and which features are useful or desirable, and (2) To establish whether HPs treating people with diabetes recommend diabetes apps, which features were thought to be useful, and which features were they confident to recommend.
We saw no significant interaction between the treatment group and any of the prespecified subgroups: type 1 versus type 2 diabetes (P=0.82), non-Māori/non-Pacific versus Māori/Pacific ethnicity (P=0.60), high urban versus high rural/remote region (P=0.38). Adjusted mean differences on change in HbA1c from baseline to nine months for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were −5.75 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval −10.08 to −1.43, P=0.009) and −3.64 mmol/mol (−7.72 to 0.44, P=0.08), respectively. Adjusted mean differences for non-Māori/non-Pacific and Māori/Pacific people were −4.97 mmol/mol (−8.51 to −1.43, P=0.006) and −3.21 mmol/mol (−9.11 to 2.70, P=0.28), respectively. Adjusted mean differences for participants living in high urban and high rural/remote areas were −4.54 mmol/mol (−8.40 to −0.68, P=0.02) and −3.94 mmol/mol (−9.00 to 1.12, P=0.13), respectively (table 3).
Mobile phone ownership rates are increasing. Similar to trends seen in the United States and Canada, where mobile phone ownership is 72% and 67%, respectively [20], 70% of New Zealanders own a mobile phone, making diabetes apps potentially available to most people [21]. Limited research exists into the use of diabetes apps in New Zealand. However with increasing rates of both diabetes prevalence and mobile phone ownership, access to safe apps is essential for both HPs as potential app prescribers and patients as app users [21,22]. In Scotland, a survey of people with diabetes found high mobile phone ownership (67%) with over half reporting an interest in using apps for self-management of diabetes, but app usage in only 7% of responders [23]. The objectives of this study were (1) To establish whether people with diabetes use apps to assist with diabetes self-management and which features are useful or desirable, and (2) To establish whether HPs treating people with diabetes recommend diabetes apps, which features were thought to be useful, and which features were they confident to recommend.
We recognize that the Stop Diabetes movement is built on relationships and understanding what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs. We hope this blog will act as window for you into the role of the Association in this movement. Let us know how we’re doing – email us at diabetesstopshere@diabetes.org.
In this large sample of people with diabetes attending a secondary care clinic in NZ, 19.6% (37/189) of patients reported using diabetes apps to support their self-management. Diabetes app users were younger and more often had T1DM. The most used app feature in current app users was a blood glucose diary (87%, 32/37). The most desirable feature of a future app was an insulin dose calculation function in app users (46%) and a blood glucose diary in non-app users (64.4%). A Scottish survey has reported similar results and observed that people with T1DM were more likely to desire insulin calculators in an app [23].
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