“There have been so many touching moments in the movement to Stop Diabetes since we launched last year,” commented Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “People have shared courageous stories of facing their diabetes head on, while others have shared their heart-breaking experiences of losing a loved one because of diabetes. The blog is a new way to raise our collective voices and tell people why we need to Stop Diabetes once and for all.”  
Participants could choose to receive blood glucose monitoring reminders to which they could reply by sending in their result by text message. They could then view their results graphically over time on a password protected website. If they were identified as not having access to the internet at baseline they were mailed their graphs once a month. All messages were delivered in English although the Māori version included keywords in Te Reo Māori and the Pacific version had keywords in either Samoan or Tongan dependent on ethnicity. Examples of SMS4BG messages can be seen in the box. Participants were able to select the timing of messages and reminders, and identify the names of their support people and motivations for incorporation into the messages. The duration of the programme was also tailored to individual preferences. At three and six months, participants received a message asking if they would like to continue the programme for an additional three months, and had the opportunity to reselect their modules receiving up to a maximum nine months of messages. Participants could stop their messages by texting the word “STOP” or put messages on hold by texting “HOLIDAY.”
The average reduction of 4.2 mmol/mol (0.4%) in HbA1c seen in this study did not reach the level chosen to signify clinical significance in the initial power calculation (5.5 mmol/mol (0.5%) reduction in HbA1c). Therefore, this study is unable to conclude that the effects of the SMS4BG intervention are clinically significant. Although further investigation is needed, we believe the results have the potential to still be clinically relevant in practice, particularly among individuals with high levels of HbA1c, such as the participants with poorly controlled diabetes in this study. The unadjusted group difference on change in HbA1c from baseline was −5.89, −3.05 and −5.24 mmol/mol at three, six, and nine months, respectively. The main analysis, with adjustment for baseline value and stratification factors, showed a smaller treatment effect, although both results were significant at three and nine months. Similar results were found across major subgroups of interest despite the fact that these analyses were not specifically powered. These consistent findings led us to believe that the intervention shows promising effects on treating people with poorly controlled diabetes and warrants further investigation.
Mobile phone ownership rates are increasing. Similar to trends seen in the United States and Canada, where mobile phone ownership is 72% and 67%, respectively [20], 70% of New Zealanders own a mobile phone, making diabetes apps potentially available to most people [21]. Limited research exists into the use of diabetes apps in New Zealand. However with increasing rates of both diabetes prevalence and mobile phone ownership, access to safe apps is essential for both HPs as potential app prescribers and patients as app users [21,22]. In Scotland, a survey of people with diabetes found high mobile phone ownership (67%) with over half reporting an interest in using apps for self-management of diabetes, but app usage in only 7% of responders [23]. The objectives of this study were (1) To establish whether people with diabetes use apps to assist with diabetes self-management and which features are useful or desirable, and (2) To establish whether HPs treating people with diabetes recommend diabetes apps, which features were thought to be useful, and which features were they confident to recommend.
Additional data on all patients were collected from the hospital management system, including age, and the most recent values within the previous 12 months from date of survey for blood pressure (BP), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), urinary microalbumin to Creatinine ratio (ACR), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), and total cholesterol to HDL ratio (C:HDL). Prescription of lipid lowering drugs, anti-hypertensive drugs, insulin, or other hypoglycemic medication were also extracted from the medication list from the last visit within the sample period. Type of diabetes was self-reported in the survey (type 1 [T1DM], type 2 [T2DM], other or unknown) and in four participants who had selected ‘other’ or ‘unknown’ diabetes type was determined by examination of the clinical records. For categorization of participants by app use, 4 responders who did not indicate if they had a mobile phone or not were included in the non-app group.

The 1177 people with diabetes attending clinics at Capital and Coast District Health Board (CCDHB), Wellington, New Zealand over a 12-month period (10th September 2014 to 10th September 2015) were the sample population. Out of the total patients, 521 patients with an email address in the hospital management system were invited to participate via email. To include a representation of people without a recorded email address in the sample (n=656), every 5th person was telephoned (up to twice) and invited to provide an email address. Of the 131 patients telephoned, 54 (41.2%) were reached, of whom 49 (91%) agreed to participate. Patients without phone numbers or unable to provide an email address were excluded. This generated a sample population of 570 people.

We saw no significant interaction between the treatment group and any of the prespecified subgroups: type 1 versus type 2 diabetes (P=0.82), non-Māori/non-Pacific versus Māori/Pacific ethnicity (P=0.60), high urban versus high rural/remote region (P=0.38). Adjusted mean differences on change in HbA1c from baseline to nine months for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were −5.75 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval −10.08 to −1.43, P=0.009) and −3.64 mmol/mol (−7.72 to 0.44, P=0.08), respectively. Adjusted mean differences for non-Māori/non-Pacific and Māori/Pacific people were −4.97 mmol/mol (−8.51 to −1.43, P=0.006) and −3.21 mmol/mol (−9.11 to 2.70, P=0.28), respectively. Adjusted mean differences for participants living in high urban and high rural/remote areas were −4.54 mmol/mol (−8.40 to −0.68, P=0.02) and −3.94 mmol/mol (−9.00 to 1.12, P=0.13), respectively (table 3).
Lack of insulin results in ketoacidosis. Ketones are acids that develop in the blood and appear in the urine. Ketones could poison the body and this is a warning sign that the diabetes is out of control. Symptoms of diabetes involve nausea, shortness of breath, vomiting, fruity flavor in breath, dry mouth, and high glucose levels. Complications associated with diabetes are retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, heart disease and gangrene. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is yet another problem associated with diabetes mellitus. Symptoms include hunger, tremor, seizure, sweating, dizziness, jerks, tingling sensation and pale skin color. Improper management of diabetes causes low blood sugar, which in turn causes hypoglycemic coma. It is a life threatening condition.
The A1C is a common blood test that measures the amount of glucose that is attached to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. It has a variety of other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1 and is used in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Unlike the traditional blood glucose test, the A1C does not require fasting, and blood can be drawn at any time of day. It is hoped that this will result in more people getting tested and decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes, which is currently estimated to be more than 7 million adults in the U.S. (more…)
Some of the most vocal diabetes stories come from blogs and other social media platforms which create a broad online community of people who have diabetes or whose loved ones are living with the disease.  “By means of this blog,” noted Hausner, “we hope to add our voice to this dialogue and further engage with those who may be well aware of the effects diabetes can have on their lives.”
“There have been so many touching moments in the movement to Stop Diabetes since we launched last year,” commented Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “People have shared courageous stories of facing their diabetes head on, while others have shared their heart-breaking experiences of losing a loved one because of diabetes. The blog is a new way to raise our collective voices and tell people why we need to Stop Diabetes once and for all.”  
The 1177 people with diabetes attending clinics at Capital and Coast District Health Board (CCDHB), Wellington, New Zealand over a 12-month period (10th September 2014 to 10th September 2015) were the sample population. Out of the total patients, 521 patients with an email address in the hospital management system were invited to participate via email. To include a representation of people without a recorded email address in the sample (n=656), every 5th person was telephoned (up to twice) and invited to provide an email address. Of the 131 patients telephoned, 54 (41.2%) were reached, of whom 49 (91%) agreed to participate. Patients without phone numbers or unable to provide an email address were excluded. This generated a sample population of 570 people.
Participants could choose to receive blood glucose monitoring reminders to which they could reply by sending in their result by text message. They could then view their results graphically over time on a password protected website. If they were identified as not having access to the internet at baseline they were mailed their graphs once a month. All messages were delivered in English although the Māori version included keywords in Te Reo Māori and the Pacific version had keywords in either Samoan or Tongan dependent on ethnicity. Examples of SMS4BG messages can be seen in the box. Participants were able to select the timing of messages and reminders, and identify the names of their support people and motivations for incorporation into the messages. The duration of the programme was also tailored to individual preferences. At three and six months, participants received a message asking if they would like to continue the programme for an additional three months, and had the opportunity to reselect their modules receiving up to a maximum nine months of messages. Participants could stop their messages by texting the word “STOP” or put messages on hold by texting “HOLIDAY.”
Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which is accompanied by high blood glucose levels. It is a result of improper functioning of the pancreas, which secretes the insulin hormone. Lack of insulin, result in ketoacidosis. Makhana or Fox nut is a sweet and sour seed, which is also known as Euryale ferox. These seeds contain starch and ten percent of protein. There is no supporting literature for its positive association with diabetes. Therapeutic effects of fox nut involve its strengthening of kidney. It also helps to relieve the dampness, associated with leucorrhoea. It also regulates hypertension or high blood pressure. It is also beneficial for individuals with impotence and arthritis. Fox nuts are effective for individuals with high risk of premature ageing. It is also known as gorgon nut, is also helpful.
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