-Keep your cholesterol levels in normal range. The liver makes cholesterol and it is also found in the foods we eat such as eggs, meats and dairy products. High cholesterol levels can clog your arteries and put you at risk of developing heart disease and stroke. If you have high cholesterol, you can help lower it by losing weight, exercising and eating a healthful diet.
The growing prevalence of diabetes is considered to be one of the biggest global health issues.1 People of ethnic minorities, including Pacific and Māori (New Zealand indigenous population) groups, are particularly vulnerable to the development of diabetes, experience poorer control, and increased rates of complications.23456 In New Zealand, 29% of patients with diabetes were found to have HbA1c levels indicative of poor control (≥65 mmol/mol or 8%), putting them at risk for the development of debilitating and costly complications.7 Diabetes complications can be prevented or delayed with good blood glucose control, which is not only advantageous for a person’s quality of life but also will substantially reduce healthcare costs associated with treating or managing the complications.89101112
A large patient sample size was obtained by contacting all patients seen in the last 12 months with an email address. The risk of overrepresentation by more technology-literate responders through recruitment via email was minimized by also recruiting via telephone and by providing paper surveys at the HPs’ conference. The demographic and clinical data of responders and non-responders were compared, and most variables showed no difference. Responders were actually older than non-responders and had better glycemic control. This study focused on the beliefs and opinions of people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers) rather than simply describing apps for diabetes . It is one of the first papers to describe app use in people with diabetes in New Zealand.
We recognize that the Stop Diabetes movement is built on relationships and understanding what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs. We hope this blog will act as window for you into the role of the Association in this movement. Let us know how we’re doing – email us at diabetesstopshere@diabetes.org.
Lack of insulin results in ketoacidosis. Ketones are acids that develop in the blood and appear in the urine. Ketones could poison the body and this is a warning sign that the diabetes is out of control. Symptoms of diabetes involve nausea, shortness of breath, vomiting, fruity flavor in breath, dry mouth, and high glucose levels. Complications associated with diabetes are retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, heart disease and gangrene. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is yet another problem associated with diabetes mellitus. Symptoms include hunger, tremor, seizure, sweating, dizziness, jerks, tingling sensation and pale skin color. Improper management of diabetes causes low blood sugar, which in turn causes hypoglycemic coma. It is a life threatening condition.
This study showed that a tailored and automated SMS self management support programme has potential for improving glycaemic control in adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Although the clinical significance of these results is unclear, and the full duration of these effects is yet to be determined, exploration of SMS4BG to supplement current practice is warranted.

This study showed that a tailored and automated SMS self management support programme has potential for improving glycaemic control in adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Although the clinical significance of these results is unclear, and the full duration of these effects is yet to be determined, exploration of SMS4BG to supplement current practice is warranted.
The A1C is a common blood test that measures the amount of glucose that is attached to the hemoglobin in our red blood cells. It has a variety of other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1 and is used in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Unlike the traditional blood glucose test, the A1C does not require fasting, and blood can be drawn at any time of day. It is hoped that this will result in more people getting tested and decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes, which is currently estimated to be more than 7 million adults in the U.S. (more…)
I am passionate about diabetes education, so when you purchase from the Diabetes Depot, you also have at your disposal the resources of a pharmacist, a Certified Diabetes Educator and a fellow pumper. I am a member of a Peterborough Family Health Team, where I have the opportunity to help clients manage their diabetes. I have given many lectures on the management and prevention of diabetes complications to both patient groups and health care professionals throughout Canada, and am the proud recipient of numerous awards for this work. I hope my effort to provide lower-cost insulin pump supplies to Canadians will help you, and I again invite you to contact me with your specific diabetes questions.
Mobile phone ownership rates are increasing. Similar to trends seen in the United States and Canada, where mobile phone ownership is 72% and 67%, respectively [20], 70% of New Zealanders own a mobile phone, making diabetes apps potentially available to most people [21]. Limited research exists into the use of diabetes apps in New Zealand. However with increasing rates of both diabetes prevalence and mobile phone ownership, access to safe apps is essential for both HPs as potential app prescribers and patients as app users [21,22]. In Scotland, a survey of people with diabetes found high mobile phone ownership (67%) with over half reporting an interest in using apps for self-management of diabetes, but app usage in only 7% of responders [23]. The objectives of this study were (1) To establish whether people with diabetes use apps to assist with diabetes self-management and which features are useful or desirable, and (2) To establish whether HPs treating people with diabetes recommend diabetes apps, which features were thought to be useful, and which features were they confident to recommend.
In this large sample of people with diabetes attending a secondary care clinic in NZ, 19.6% (37/189) of patients reported using diabetes apps to support their self-management. Diabetes app users were younger and more often had T1DM. The most used app feature in current app users was a blood glucose diary (87%, 32/37). The most desirable feature of a future app was an insulin dose calculation function in app users (46%) and a blood glucose diary in non-app users (64.4%). A Scottish survey has reported similar results and observed that people with T1DM were more likely to desire insulin calculators in an app [23].

Wednesday Walks are a joint venture between Korowhai Aroha Health Centre and Diabetes NZ Rotorua Branch. Join Mary every Wednesday morning for some gentle exercise in good company. The idea is to have fun and encourage each other to exercise. Our Wednesday Walks set out from the Waka on the Lakefront at 9am sharp. The walk lasts for up to an hour. You can go at your own pace and there is no minimum level of fitness required. Wear a hat and bring walking shoes, water & extra carbohydrate foods if you are prone to low blood sugar levels. Bring your partner, friend, kids or mokopuna.

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