Diabetes has become so common in the U.S. that there may be a danger of losing sight of just how serious a disease it is. In the diabetic community, there has long been a saying that diabetes won’t kill you, but its complications will. The list of complications is long and includes, heart disease, nerve damage, kidney failure, foot and leg amputation, blindness, Alzheimer’s and a host of others. And, while the saying about diabetes not killing you may be catchy, the truth, according to the American Diabetes Association, is that, “Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death, and a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death.” (more…)

The message delivery was managed by our content management system, with messages sent and received through a gateway company to allow for participants to be registered with any mobile network. Sending and receiving messages was free for participants. The system maintained logs of all outgoing and incoming messages. Further details of the intervention can be seen in the published pilot study,28 and protocol.30
We’ll also teach you what to do with everything you’re learning. Using the latest research and stories from people with diabetes, we’ll help you make small changes through short videos and simple action items. Soon, you’ll be seeing results, feeling better and having more energy. Many people with diabetes say that they’re healthier NOW than they were before they were diagnosed– you can be one of them!
Almost two-thirds of HPs responding had recommended a diabetes app to patients. Dieticians were more likely to recommend an app than others. Blood glucose and carbohydrate diaries were considered the most useful feature and HPs were most confident to recommend blood glucose diaries. HPs are the least confident recommending insulin dose calculation functions. Over one-third of HPs desire guidance with app recommendations.
In conclusion, there has been a steady increase in type 1 diabetes incidence in children <15 yr in Auckland over a 20-year span. However, in contrast to observations elsewhere, age at diagnosis in Auckland has increased over the study period. Our data do not support the ‘accelerator hypothesis’, and factors other than simply increasing adiposity are likely to be at play.
There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)
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In Type 1 Diabetes, symptoms are often sudden and can be life-threatening; therefore it is usually diagnosed quite quickly. In Type 2 Diabetes, many people have no symptoms at all, while other signs can go unnoticed, being seen as part of ‘getting older’. Therefore, by the time symptoms are noticed, complications of diabetes may already be present.
Diabetes Depot carries a full line insulin pump supplies, including all major insulin infusions sets, insulin reservoirs and cartridges available in Canada, all at significant discounts below the manufacturer's list price. Our product line of diabetic supplies, required daily by people living with diabetes, include blood glucose meters, glucose test strips, lancets, insulin pen needles, insulin products, Dex-4 glucose tablets and Emla anesthetic cream. We also carry accessories such as pump clips, pump cases & pouches, prep pads, battery caps, diabetic socks, and helpful books on diabetes… everything an insulin pump user would require. Plus, because the Diabetes Depot is located within Stutt's Pharmacy, we also offer a complete prescription service.
The majority of responders were not using diabetes apps (80.4%, 152/189), although 60.5% (89/147) reported they would be interested in trying one. Of the 118 people who answered the question, the reasons for not using an app was not knowing they existed (66.9%, 79/118), feeling confident without one (16.9%, 20/118), discontinued use after having used an app previously 16.9% (20/118).
Phoenix Health Centre carries out pre employment medical assessments for several large employers in Whakatane. These give a base line recording of an employee’s health status at the time they were employed. It is then possible to monitor the employee’s health in relation to the hazards they may be exposed to in the workplace. If required we also undertake monitored urine sampling for ESR drug testing.
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