We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)

Of the 189 responders (35.0% response rate) to the patient survey, 19.6% (37/189) had used a diabetes app. App users were younger and in comparison to other forms of diabetes mellitus, users prominently had type 1 DM. The most favored feature of the app users was a glucose diary (87%, 32/37), and an insulin calculator was the most desirable function for a future app (46%, 17/37). In non-app users, the most desirable feature for a future app was a glucose diary (64.4%, 98/152). Of the 115 responders (40.2% response rate) to the HPs survey, 60.1% (68/113) had recommended a diabetes app. Diaries for blood glucose levels and carbohydrate counting were considered the most useful app features and the features HPs felt most confident to recommend. HPs were least confident in recommending insulin calculation apps.
The control group also experienced a decrease in HbA1c from baseline to the nine month follow-up, and experienced improvements in secondary outcomes, which could indicate trial effects. Previous research has shown that recruitment to a clinical trial alone can result in improvements in HbA1c,43 but it is not expected that these improvements would be sustainable past the initial few months without intervention.

Height and weight were recorded for 660 patients at their required first post-diagnostic clinic (on average 15 weeks from diagnosis) from 1994 onwards. Annual mean BMI SDS of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes did not alter (average non-significant change smaller than ±0.02 SDS/year) over the period for the entire population, or for any gender, age, or ethnicity sub-group. There was no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis.


Almost two-thirds of HPs responding had recommended a diabetes app to patients. Dieticians were more likely to recommend an app than others. Blood glucose and carbohydrate diaries were considered the most useful feature and HPs were most confident to recommend blood glucose diaries. HPs are the least confident recommending insulin dose calculation functions. Over one-third of HPs desire guidance with app recommendations.
“There have been so many touching moments in the movement to Stop Diabetes since we launched last year,” commented Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “People have shared courageous stories of facing their diabetes head on, while others have shared their heart-breaking experiences of losing a loved one because of diabetes. The blog is a new way to raise our collective voices and tell people why we need to Stop Diabetes once and for all.”  

Diabetes Depot carries a full line insulin pump supplies, including all major insulin infusions sets, insulin reservoirs and cartridges available in Canada, all at significant discounts below the manufacturer's list price. Our product line of diabetic supplies, required daily by people living with diabetes, include blood glucose meters, glucose test strips, lancets, insulin pen needles, insulin products, Dex-4 glucose tablets and Emla anesthetic cream. We also carry accessories such as pump clips, pump cases & pouches, prep pads, battery caps, diabetic socks, and helpful books on diabetes… everything an insulin pump user would require. Plus, because the Diabetes Depot is located within Stutt's Pharmacy, we also offer a complete prescription service.


Patients were involved in all stages of the study, including the initial conceptualisation and formative work leading to the development of SMS4BG (for more information, see the development paper28). Patient feedback informed the intervention modality, purpose, and structure, and patients reviewed intervention content before it was finalised. Patient feedback on the acceptability of SMS4BG through the pilot study28 led to improvements to the intervention including additional modules, the option for feedback graphs to be posted, additional tailoring variables, and a longer duration of intervention. Patient feedback also informed the design of this trial—specifically its duration, the inclusion criteria, and recruitment methods. Additionally, patients contributed to workshops of key stakeholders held to discuss interpretation, dissemination of the findings, and potential implementation. We have thanked all participants for their involvement and they will be given access to all published results when these are made publicly available.
The majority of responders were not using diabetes apps (80.4%, 152/189), although 60.5% (89/147) reported they would be interested in trying one. Of the 118 people who answered the question, the reasons for not using an app was not knowing they existed (66.9%, 79/118), feeling confident without one (16.9%, 20/118), discontinued use after having used an app previously 16.9% (20/118).
We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)
For example, adjusting to having diabetes; difficulty in making the life changes necessary to stay well; difficulty managing anger, conflict and other emotions related to your health; depression, sadness and grief; anxiety, worries, panic and phobias related to your health; eating difficulties; and difficulty with coping with the complications of diabetes.
The survey was piloted with the first 30 patients with an email addresses (chronological order of clinic visits). Responses were reviewed after response rate reached 50%. As 4 questions were unanswered by some participants, a “none of the above” option was added. The invitations were sent out to the remaining 540 participants. A further 31 participants were excluded (4 email address errors, 13 gestational diabetes, 10 deceased, 4 did not have diabetes) resulting in a final total of 539 participants. This survey remained open for 3 weeks, with reminders sent to non-responders at one week and two weeks.
There were 884 new cases of type 1 diabetes, and age at diagnosis rose from 7.6 yr in 1990/1 to 8.9 yr in 2008/9 (r2 = 0.31, p = 0.009). There was a progressive increase in type 1 diabetes incidence among children <15 yr (p<0.0001), reaching 22.5 per 100,000 in 2009. However, the rise in incidence did not occur evenly among age groups, being 2.5-fold higher in older children (10–14 yr) than in the youngest group (0–4 yr). The incidence of new cases of type 1 diabetes was highest in New Zealand Europeans throughout the study period in all age groups (p<0.0001), but the rate of increase was similar in New Zealand Europeans and Non-Europeans. Type 1 diabetes incidence and average annual increase were similar in both sexes. There was no change in BMI SDS shortly after diagnosis, and no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis.
Today’s first post is titled “Why ‘Stop Diabetes’?” can be found at www.diabetesstopshere.org. This initial post seeks to explain why the Stop Diabetes movement was created and its goal for engaging the public.  “The goal of the Stop Diabetes movement is to grow to epic proportions, to be bigger than the disease itself,” the blog explains. “In short, it’s the answer to why the Association does the work that it does.”

As published in the protocol, a sample size of 500 participants (250 per arm) was estimated to provide 90% power at the 5% significance level to detect a clinically meaningful group difference of 0.5% (5.5 mmol/mol) in HbA1c at nine months, assuming a standard deviation of 1.7% (18.6 mmol/mol). Despite extensive efforts, recruitment for the study was slower than expected, and with the limited overall study period available, a post hoc power calculation was conducted in September 2016. A revised sample size of 366 participants (183 per arm) was targeted, which would provide 80% power to detect the same effect size under the same assumptions.

We recognize that the Stop Diabetes movement is built on relationships and understanding what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs. We hope this blog will act as window for you into the role of the Association in this movement. Let us know how we’re doing – email us at diabetesstopshere@diabetes.org.

The main treatment effect on the primary outcome is presented in table 2. The reduction in HbA1c from baseline to nine month follow-up was significantly greater in the intervention group than in the control group (mean −8.85 mmol/mol (standard deviation 14.84) v −3.96 mmol/mol (17.02), adjusted mean difference −4.23 (95% confidence interval −7.30 to −1.15), P=0.007). The adjusted mean difference on change in HbA1c at three and six months were −4.76 (−8.10 to −1.43), P=0.005) and −2.36 (−5.75 to 1.04), P=0.17), respectively (table 2).


Cost effectiveness as well as healthcare use was assessed during the study period compared with the nine months before randomisation (presented separately). We measured patient engagement and satisfaction with the intervention using semistructured interviews and data from the content management system. The secondary outcomes health related quality of life and perceived social support were not included in the initial trial registration but added before commencing the trial.
The HPs’ survey was completed by 115 out of 286 HPs (40.2% response rate, 78 online, 37 paper). Table 6 shows the characteristics of responders. Almost all HPs (96.5%, 111/115) owned a mobile phone and of the 113 who answered, 60.2% (68/113) had recommended an app for diabetes management to a patient. Dieticians were most likely to have recommended an app (83%, 10/12), followed by nurses (66%, 42/64), (P=.006). There was no relationship between app recommendation and the number of years of treating diabetes (P=.48) or the responder’s age (P=.49).
We recognize that the Stop Diabetes movement is built on relationships and understanding what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs. We hope this blog will act as window for you into the role of the Association in this movement. Let us know how we’re doing – email us at diabetesstopshere@diabetes.org.
New Zealand has a population of approximately 4.4 million people, the majority being of European descent. Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, is the most ethnically diverse, with approximately 11% of people identifying themselves as indigenous Maori, 14% as Pacific, and 19% as Asian [12]. By international standards, the incidence of type 1 diabetes in young New Zealanders was assessed as moderate at 17.9 per 100,000 [13]. However, this figure was obtained from a 2-year snapshot, and did not provide information on possible time trends on type 1 diabetes incidence. In addition, previous studies on type 1 diabetes incidence in New Zealand are out of date or refer to a specific geographical region [14], [15], [16].
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