Another goal of this blog is to give you a behind-the-scenes look at what the Association does on a daily basis to fulfill its mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people living with diabetes.  Our staff’s dedication – combined the stories that provide them with inspiration through the day – is a critical part of the Stop Diabetes movement.
Strengths of the intervention were that it was theoretically based, the information reinforced messages from standard care, and it was system initiated, personally tailored, and used simple technology. These strengths result in high relevance to diverse individuals, increasing the intervention’s reach and acceptability. Unlike SMS4BG, previous diabetes SMS programmes have largely focused on specific groups—for example, limiting their generalisability. Furthermore, the SMS4BG intervention was tailored and personalised to the individual. Although this specificity results in a more complex intervention in relation to its delivery, it appears to be a worthwhile endeavour with high satisfaction and the majority of participants happy with their message dosage.
The majority of responders were not using diabetes apps (80.4%, 152/189), although 60.5% (89/147) reported they would be interested in trying one. Of the 118 people who answered the question, the reasons for not using an app was not knowing they existed (66.9%, 79/118), feeling confident without one (16.9%, 20/118), discontinued use after having used an app previously 16.9% (20/118).
Cost effectiveness as well as healthcare use was assessed during the study period compared with the nine months before randomisation (presented separately). We measured patient engagement and satisfaction with the intervention using semistructured interviews and data from the content management system. The secondary outcomes health related quality of life and perceived social support were not included in the initial trial registration but added before commencing the trial.

A total of 884 new patients aged <15 yr were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over the 20-year period covered by this study. There was an increase in the mean age at diagnosis from 7.6 yr in 1990/1 to 8.9 yr in 2008/9 (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.31, p = 0.009). This was observed in both males (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.22, p = 0.04) and females (0.06/yr, r2 = 0.13, p = 0.12).
Like my customers, I use an insulin pump to control my diabetes because it allows me to be spontaneous and flexible in managing my diabetes while reducing hypoglycemia. Reaching target blood glucose levels is not always easy, but being a Pharmacist, as well as a Certified Diabetes Educator and Certified Pump Trainer, I know the importance of managing my blood glucose to reduce long-term complications. You are welcome to contact me about any aspect of insulin pump therapy or with any questions about specific insulin pump supplies.

Most people know that diabetes involves the inability to control glucose, or blood sugar, by not producing enough insulin or not managing it correctly. This leads to elevated levels of glucose in the body, which can result in very serious complications, such as heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, hardening of the arteries, foot and leg amputation and blindness. (more…)
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Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf and declare: support from Waitemata District Health Board for the development of SMS4BG, and support from the Health Research Council of New Zealand in partnership with the Waitemata District Health Board and Auckland District Health Board, and the New Zealand Ministry of Health for the randomised controlled trial; no financial relationships with any organisations that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years; no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.
Results The reduction in HbA1c at nine months was significantly greater in the intervention group (mean −8.85 mmol/mol (standard deviation 14.84)) than in the control group (−3.96 mmol/mol (17.02); adjusted mean difference −4.23 (95% confidence interval −7.30 to −1.15), P=0.007). Of 21 secondary outcomes, only four showed statistically significant improvements in favour of the intervention group at nine months. Significant improvements were seen for foot care behaviour (adjusted mean difference 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.29), P<0.001), overall diabetes support (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03), health status on the EQ-5D visual analogue scale (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03), and perceptions of illness identity (−0.54 (−1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). High levels of satisfaction with SMS4BG were found, with 161 (95%) of 169 participants reporting it to be useful, and 164 (97%) willing to recommend the programme to other people with diabetes.
Cost effectiveness as well as healthcare use was assessed during the study period compared with the nine months before randomisation (presented separately). We measured patient engagement and satisfaction with the intervention using semistructured interviews and data from the content management system. The secondary outcomes health related quality of life and perceived social support were not included in the initial trial registration but added before commencing the trial.
The HPs’ survey was completed by 115 out of 286 HPs (40.2% response rate, 78 online, 37 paper). Table 6 shows the characteristics of responders. Almost all HPs (96.5%, 111/115) owned a mobile phone and of the 113 who answered, 60.2% (68/113) had recommended an app for diabetes management to a patient. Dieticians were most likely to have recommended an app (83%, 10/12), followed by nurses (66%, 42/64), (P=.006). There was no relationship between app recommendation and the number of years of treating diabetes (P=.48) or the responder’s age (P=.49).
Diabetes Depot carries a full line insulin pump supplies, including all major insulin infusions sets, insulin reservoirs and cartridges available in Canada, all at significant discounts below the manufacturer's list price. Our product line of diabetic supplies, required daily by people living with diabetes, include blood glucose meters, glucose test strips, lancets, insulin pen needles, insulin products, Dex-4 glucose tablets and Emla anesthetic cream. We also carry accessories such as pump clips, pump cases & pouches, prep pads, battery caps, diabetic socks, and helpful books on diabetes… everything an insulin pump user would require. Plus, because the Diabetes Depot is located within Stutt's Pharmacy, we also offer a complete prescription service.
-Learn to eat well-balanced meals that include healthful food choices (vegetables, fruits, whole grains, etc.) and watch your portion sizes. Even foods that are good for you can add pounds to your waistline, if you consume too much of them. Losing those extra pounds will help you manage not only your diabetes, but also other health problems you may have.
Overall, all five potential app features were considered useful, with more than 60% of responders selecting that these features were useful, very useful, or extremely useful on the scale of scale 1 (not at all useful) to 5 (extremely useful). Equally, the mean usefulness score was higher than 3 for all 5 features. Blood glucose and carbohydrate intake diaries were rated as being the most useful app feature (Figure 1), with the highest mean score of 3.64 (SD 0.948) for usefulness (Table 7).
Data sharing: The research team will consider reasonable requests for sharing of deidentified patient level data. Requests should be made to the corresponding author. Consent for data sharing was not obtained but the presented data are anonymised and risk of identification is low. The original protocol30 is available from the corresponding author on request.
The growing prevalence of diabetes is considered to be one of the biggest global health issues.1 People of ethnic minorities, including Pacific and Māori (New Zealand indigenous population) groups, are particularly vulnerable to the development of diabetes, experience poorer control, and increased rates of complications.23456 In New Zealand, 29% of patients with diabetes were found to have HbA1c levels indicative of poor control (≥65 mmol/mol or 8%), putting them at risk for the development of debilitating and costly complications.7 Diabetes complications can be prevented or delayed with good blood glucose control, which is not only advantageous for a person’s quality of life but also will substantially reduce healthcare costs associated with treating or managing the complications.89101112
New Zealand celebrates Diabetes Action Month – and the results of last year’s risk factor assessment highlight the importance of getting involved: Last year, more than 3,500 people undertook an assessment of their risk factors during the month, with 68% learning they potentially have a greater propensity for type 2 diabetes. The core purpose of the first Diabetes Action Month was to alert New Zealand that everyone is at risk of diabetes. Activities in November included a national roadshow that visited 33 locations in 14 towns and cities, and the launch of an online version of the risk awareness tool, so everyone could assess their risk

The biggest study limitation was the difficulty with recruitment, which resulted in a sample size smaller than initially planned. One reason for the low recruitment was the required time needed by clinicians to identify and refer patients to the study, which was not always available. Furthermore, many referred patients who did not meet the HbA1c inclusion criteria were still referred because clinicians had thought these individuals would benefit from the programme. This limitation highlights the difference between research and implementation where strict criteria can be relaxed. Alternative methods of recruitment could be explored, such as through laboratory test facilities to ensure access to the intervention regardless of clinician availability.
One of the most important aspects of diabetes management is to maintain a healthy body weight. Being overweight not only increases your risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers, it also makes your diabetes harder to manage. Small changes in your diet such as reducing your portion sizes and swapping to low-fat dairy products can help you to achieve a healthy body weight and manage your diabetes.
Strengths of the current study included its sample size, diverse population, very low loss to follow-up, pragmatic design, absence of protocol violations, and objectively measured primary outcome. Although the initial sample size target was not reached, the final sample of 366 participants is larger than previous randomised controlled trials in this area. This study contributes valuable evidence to the literature on the use of text messages in diabetes particularly for individuals with poor control. Considering poorer outcomes are experienced by ethnic minority groups, a strength of this study was its high proportion of participants representing these groups.
The 60.2% of HPs in our survey who had recommended a diabetes app is significantly higher than previously documented amongst physicians across a range of specialties [28], although it is similar to HPs’ recommendation for any type of health app [19]. We did not observe any effect of HPs’ age on app recommendation, although it is previously well established that younger HPs are more likely to adopt mHealth for diabetes [28].

Strengths of the intervention were that it was theoretically based, the information reinforced messages from standard care, and it was system initiated, personally tailored, and used simple technology. These strengths result in high relevance to diverse individuals, increasing the intervention’s reach and acceptability. Unlike SMS4BG, previous diabetes SMS programmes have largely focused on specific groups—for example, limiting their generalisability. Furthermore, the SMS4BG intervention was tailored and personalised to the individual. Although this specificity results in a more complex intervention in relation to its delivery, it appears to be a worthwhile endeavour with high satisfaction and the majority of participants happy with their message dosage.
In relation to perceptions and beliefs about diabetes, a significant reduction in illness identity (how much patients experience diabetes related symptoms) on the BIPQ was observed in favour of the intervention (adjusted mean difference −0.54 (95% confidence interval −1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). However, we saw no significant group differences for perceptions of consequences, timeline, control, concern, emotions, and illness comprehensibility. A significant improvement in health status on the EQ-5D VAS was observed in favour of the intervention (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03) but no significant differences were observed between groups for the quality of life index score. Finally, the measure of perceived support for diabetes management showed a significant improvement between the groups in how supported the participants felt in relation to their diabetes management overall (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03) but no significant group differences on appraisal, emotional, and informational support.
Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which is accompanied by high blood glucose levels. It is a result of improper functioning of the pancreas, which secretes the insulin hormone. Lack of insulin, result in ketoacidosis. Makhana or Fox nut is a sweet and sour seed, which is also known as Euryale ferox. These seeds contain starch and ten percent of protein. There is no supporting literature for its positive association with diabetes. Therapeutic effects of fox nut involve its strengthening of kidney. It also helps to relieve the dampness, associated with leucorrhoea. It also regulates hypertension or high blood pressure. It is also beneficial for individuals with impotence and arthritis. Fox nuts are effective for individuals with high risk of premature ageing. It is also known as gorgon nut, is also helpful.
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