Results The reduction in HbA1c at nine months was significantly greater in the intervention group (mean −8.85 mmol/mol (standard deviation 14.84)) than in the control group (−3.96 mmol/mol (17.02); adjusted mean difference −4.23 (95% confidence interval −7.30 to −1.15), P=0.007). Of 21 secondary outcomes, only four showed statistically significant improvements in favour of the intervention group at nine months. Significant improvements were seen for foot care behaviour (adjusted mean difference 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.29), P<0.001), overall diabetes support (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03), health status on the EQ-5D visual analogue scale (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03), and perceptions of illness identity (−0.54 (−1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). High levels of satisfaction with SMS4BG were found, with 161 (95%) of 169 participants reporting it to be useful, and 164 (97%) willing to recommend the programme to other people with diabetes.
The 60.2% of HPs in our survey who had recommended a diabetes app is significantly higher than previously documented amongst physicians across a range of specialties [28], although it is similar to HPs’ recommendation for any type of health app [19]. We did not observe any effect of HPs’ age on app recommendation, although it is previously well established that younger HPs are more likely to adopt mHealth for diabetes [28].
SMS4BG is an automated self management support programme delivered by SMS (short messaging service) to motivate and support people to engage in the behaviours needed for successful diabetes management. The programme was tailored by the needs and goals of the individual, and demographic factors. As well as core motivational and support messages (in Māori, Pacific, or non-Māori/Pacific cultural versions), participants could opt to receive additional modules including those for: insulin control, young adult support, smoking cessation, lifestyle behaviour (exercise, healthy eating, or stress/mood management), and foot care (further module details in supplementary table 1).
The use of apps to record blood glucose was the most favored function in apps used by people with diabetes, with interest in insulin dose calculating function. HPs do not feel confident in recommending insulin dose calculators. There is an urgent need for an app assessment process to give confidence in the quality and safety of diabetes management apps to people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers).

Funding: The development of SMS4BG was funded by Waitemata District Health Board. The randomised controlled trial was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand in partnership with the Waitemata District Health Board and Auckland District Health Board (through the Research Partnerships for New Zealand Health Delivery initiative), and the New Zealand Ministry of Health. The funders were not involved in any way in the preparation of the manuscript or analysis of the study results. No payment has been received for writing this publication.


One of the most important aspects of diabetes management is to maintain a healthy body weight. Being overweight not only increases your risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers, it also makes your diabetes harder to manage. Small changes in your diet such as reducing your portion sizes and swapping to low-fat dairy products can help you to achieve a healthy body weight and manage your diabetes.

Only children aged <15 yr were included. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed based on clinical features. All patients had elevated blood glucose at presentation: either a random measurement of ≥11.1 mmol/l and presence of classical symptoms, or fasting blood glucose ≥7.1 mmol/l. In addition, all patients met at least one of the following criteria: a) diabetic ketoacidosis; b) presence of at least two type 1 diabetes antibodies (to glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, islet cell, or insulin autoantibodies); or c) ongoing requirement for insulin therapy. Clinical and demographic data were prospectively recorded on all patients at each outpatient visit.
SMS4BG is an automated self management support programme delivered by SMS (short messaging service) to motivate and support people to engage in the behaviours needed for successful diabetes management. The programme was tailored by the needs and goals of the individual, and demographic factors. As well as core motivational and support messages (in Māori, Pacific, or non-Māori/Pacific cultural versions), participants could opt to receive additional modules including those for: insulin control, young adult support, smoking cessation, lifestyle behaviour (exercise, healthy eating, or stress/mood management), and foot care (further module details in supplementary table 1).
The use of apps to record blood glucose was the most favored function in apps used by people with diabetes, with interest in insulin dose calculating function. HPs do not feel confident in recommending insulin dose calculators. There is an urgent need for an app assessment process to give confidence in the quality and safety of diabetes management apps to people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers).
Diabetes Stops Here will provide snap shots of the people who are committed to putting an end to this disease, from inspiring volunteer stories to moving staff experiences to celebrity stories about how to be successful while living with diabetes. The stories, interviews and news will be shared by the blog’s author, a staff member at the American Diabetes Association, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for nearly ten years. 
Owing to individual tailoring, participants in the intervention group received varying numbers of messages. Half the participants (92/183) received messages for three months, an additional 18% (33/183) chose to continue the messages for six months, and the remaining 32% (58/183) chose to continue the messages to the maximum nine months. Only three participants chose to stop their messages early. A total number of 76 523 messages were sent by the system to participants (median number of messages per participant 242 (interquartile range 122-511; range 14-2050)), and 16 251 messages of blood glucose results were sent into the system by participants receiving the reminders (68 (1-169; 0-917)).
The 60.2% of HPs in our survey who had recommended a diabetes app is significantly higher than previously documented amongst physicians across a range of specialties [28], although it is similar to HPs’ recommendation for any type of health app [19]. We did not observe any effect of HPs’ age on app recommendation, although it is previously well established that younger HPs are more likely to adopt mHealth for diabetes [28].
Almost two-thirds of HPs responding had recommended a diabetes app to patients. Dieticians were more likely to recommend an app than others. Blood glucose and carbohydrate diaries were considered the most useful feature and HPs were most confident to recommend blood glucose diaries. HPs are the least confident recommending insulin dose calculation functions. Over one-third of HPs desire guidance with app recommendations.
Your health professional at the Centre may suggest that they make a referral for you, if there are problems affecting your diabetes management or your overall health and management. Alternatively you can ask your family doctor or nurse to refer you. If you are uncertain about whether it would be helpful to see us, you are most welcome to phone us directly to discuss this. Phone 3640 860 ext 89113.
The survey was completed by 189 of the 539 patients (35.0% response rate, 158/491 from participants with email addresses, 31/48 from telephone contact). Table 1 shows the characteristics of responders. Responders (N=189) were older, with a mean age of 50.0 years (SD 15.7) than non-responders (N=350), who had a mean age of 45.9 years (SD 16.1; P=.004) and had lower HbA1c of 62.2 mmol/mol (SD 14.0) (7.8, SD 1.1%) than non-responders (N=325) with mean of 68.9 mmol/mol (SD 18.2; 8.5, SD 2.3%; P<.001). There were no significant differences in the rate and type of anti-hypertensive, lipid lowering, and anti-hyperglycemic medications used between responders and non-responders (P=.28, −.32, and −.17, respectively). Clinical variables by type of diabetes are shown in Table 2. As expected, responders with T1DM were more likely to be on Insulin than those with T2DM (P<.001) whereas responders with T2DM were more likely to be on anti-hypertensive (P<.001) and lipid lowering medication (P<.001).
The use of apps to record blood glucose was the most favored function in apps used by people with diabetes, with interest in insulin dose calculating function. HPs do not feel confident in recommending insulin dose calculators. There is an urgent need for an app assessment process to give confidence in the quality and safety of diabetes management apps to people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers).
We recognize that the Stop Diabetes movement is built on relationships and understanding what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs. We hope this blog will act as window for you into the role of the Association in this movement. Let us know how we’re doing – email us at diabetesstopshere@diabetes.org.
Of mobile phone owners, those using diabetes apps were more likely to have T1DM (30/96) than T2DM (n=7/61); (P=.006). App users were younger with a mean age of 39.0 years (SD 11.1) compared to non-app users having a mean of 52.5 years (SD 15.6), (P<.001). There were no other significant differences in clinical variables between app and non-app users.

Like my customers, I use an insulin pump to control my diabetes because it allows me to be spontaneous and flexible in managing my diabetes while reducing hypoglycemia. Reaching target blood glucose levels is not always easy, but being a Pharmacist, as well as a Certified Diabetes Educator and Certified Pump Trainer, I know the importance of managing my blood glucose to reduce long-term complications. You are welcome to contact me about any aspect of insulin pump therapy or with any questions about specific insulin pump supplies.
Clinical psychologists have studied psychology at University, usually for at least seven years. They have specialised in learning about how the feelings, actions, beliefs, experiences and culture of people affect the way they live. They have learned how to listen to and understand people’s emotional and psychological problems and how to help people make changes in their lives.

Owing to individual tailoring, participants in the intervention group received varying numbers of messages. Half the participants (92/183) received messages for three months, an additional 18% (33/183) chose to continue the messages for six months, and the remaining 32% (58/183) chose to continue the messages to the maximum nine months. Only three participants chose to stop their messages early. A total number of 76 523 messages were sent by the system to participants (median number of messages per participant 242 (interquartile range 122-511; range 14-2050)), and 16 251 messages of blood glucose results were sent into the system by participants receiving the reminders (68 (1-169; 0-917)).
There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)
We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)
In the U.S., there are nearly 26 million people living with diabetes, and more seniors have diabetes than any other age group. Currently, one in four Americans (10.9 million, or 26.9 percent) over the age of 60 is living with diabetes. With age comes an increased risk for specific complications that require diligence and care to properly mitigate them.
ED is a failure to obtain/maintain penile erection sufficient for intercourse is more prevalent in men with diabetes and increases with age.  It is important to distinguish erectile failure from premature ejaculation, decreased libido and other problems as these have different causes and treatment. ED in diabetes is largely due to failure of vascular smooth muscle relaxation secondary to endothelial dysfunction and/or autonomic neuropathy.
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