This study shows the potential of SMS4BG to provide a low cost, scalable solution for increasing the reach of diabetes self management support. It showed that a text messaging programme can increase a patient’s feelings of support without the need for personal contact from a healthcare professional. Half of the intervention group reported sharing the messages with others. Traditional education for diabetes self management is delivered to individual patients, but there is benefit of support from other people being involved.45 This is particularly pertinent to ethnic populations such as Māori groups, in whom family have an important role in supporting diabetes self management.46
Māori Health Services at Tauranga and Whakatāne hospitals delivers health initiatives under the philosophy of Tangata Whenua Realities, Ngā Pou Mana o Io. The health model of Mana Atua, Mana Tūpuna, Mana Whenua, Mana Tangata, operates alongside clinical and rehabilitation services, Mental Health & Addiction Services and Regional Community Services.
Wednesday Walks are a joint venture between Korowhai Aroha Health Centre and Diabetes NZ Rotorua Branch. Join Mary every Wednesday morning for some gentle exercise in good company. The idea is to have fun and encourage each other to exercise. Our Wednesday Walks set out from the Waka on the Lakefront at 9am sharp. The walk lasts for up to an hour. You can go at your own pace and there is no minimum level of fitness required. Wear a hat and bring walking shoes, water & extra carbohydrate foods if you are prone to low blood sugar levels. Bring your partner, friend, kids or mokopuna.

The main effect of the intervention on secondary outcomes are presented in table 4. No significant differences were observed between the two groups for self efficacy (SEDM). A significant improvement in foot care behaviour was seen in the intervention group compared with the control group (adjusted mean difference 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.29), P<0.001) but no significant group differences were observed for diet (general or specific), exercise, blood glucose testing, and smoking behaviours (SDSCA). No significant group differences were observed for diabetes distress (DDS2).
Eligible participants were randomised to either an intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. Randomisation was stratified by health district category (high urban or high rural/remote), diabetes type (1 or 2), and ethnicity (Māori and Pacific, or non-Māori/non-Pacific). The randomisation sequence was generated by computer programme using variable block sizes of two or four, and overseen by the study statistician. Following participant consent and completion of the baseline interview, the research assistant then randomised the participant to intervention or control, using the REDCap randomisation module. The REDCap randomisation module ensured that treatment allocation was concealed until the point of randomisation. Due to the nature of the intervention, participants were aware of their treatment allocation. Research assistants conducting the phone interviews were also aware of the treatment allocation. However, the objective primary outcome was measured by blinded assessors throughout the study period.

Increase your physical activity. Exercise is a very important tool to help lower your blood glucose. Prior to starting any exercise program, you will need to consult with your doctor. Make exercise routine with activities you enjoy. In addition to helping manage your blood glucose, exercise helps lower blood pressure and improves balance, flexibility and muscle strength. Exercise may even help to reduce anxiety and depression. Go out and play!
This study shows app usage is relatively low among people with diabetes, while 60.2% of HPs have recommended an app to patients. There is, however, interest amongst people with diabetes and HPs to use diabetes apps, with strong interest in an insulin dose calculator. Apps with this feature have the potential to improve diabetes control. However, the critical problem of app safety remains a barrier to the prescription and use of insulin dose calculators. Further work is needed to ensure apps are safe and provided in a regulated environment. An app assessment process would provide HPs with confidence in the apps they recommend and would ultimately ensure app quality and safety for app users. At present, however, app users and HPs must remain cautious with diabetes apps, especially those in the insulin dose calculator category.
The {Dario} device has been perfect, I love it. I love that it’s small and discreet enough. I can now test my sugars within 20 seconds, all from the bottom of my iPhone and no one around is none the wiser… I also love that it’s “all in one”. I’ve been using it now for around 4 – 5 months. The app is great at logging and motivation with its % scoring system.
In Type 1 Diabetes, symptoms are often sudden and can be life-threatening; therefore it is usually diagnosed quite quickly. In Type 2 Diabetes, many people have no symptoms at all, while other signs can go unnoticed, being seen as part of ‘getting older’. Therefore, by the time symptoms are noticed, complications of diabetes may already be present.
Today’s first post is titled “Why ‘Stop Diabetes’?” can be found at www.diabetesstopshere.org. This initial post seeks to explain why the Stop Diabetes movement was created and its goal for engaging the public.  “The goal of the Stop Diabetes movement is to grow to epic proportions, to be bigger than the disease itself,” the blog explains. “In short, it’s the answer to why the Association does the work that it does.”

There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)
Of mobile phone owners, those using diabetes apps were more likely to have T1DM (30/96) than T2DM (n=7/61); (P=.006). App users were younger with a mean age of 39.0 years (SD 11.1) compared to non-app users having a mean of 52.5 years (SD 15.6), (P<.001). There were no other significant differences in clinical variables between app and non-app users.
The American Diabetes Association launched its first official blog today to help put a face on a disease that kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.  The blog, called Diabetes Stops Here: Living with Diabetes; Inspired to Stop It, aims to document the Stop Diabetes® movement by reaching and engaging the 23.6 million Americans living with diabetes as well as the 57 million who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. 

We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)
Conclusion A tailored, text message based, self management support programme resulted in modest improvements in glycaemic control in adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Although the clinical significance of these results is unclear, the findings support further investigation into the use of SMS4BG and other text message based support for this patient population.

The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus has been increasing worldwide [1], [2], [3], and it appears to have been particularly pronounced among children <5 years of age (yr) [3], [4], [5]. This increase has been suggested to be associated with the ‘accelerator hypothesis’ [6]. Although this hypothesis is not universally accepted [7], it predicts that higher BMI is associated with younger age at type 1 diabetes diagnosis [8], which has been demonstrated in some studies [9], [10], [11].
Participants were referred to the study by healthcare professionals at their primary and secondary care centres across New Zealand. Additionally, participants could self refer to the study. Eligible participants were English speaking adults aged 16 years and over with poorly controlled type 1 or 2 diabetes (defined as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration ≥65 mmol/mol or 8% in the preceding nine months). The initial protocol required HbA1c concentration above the cutoff level within the past three months, but after feedback from patients and clinicians, this period was extended to nine months to ensure a greater reach across those people not having regular tests. Participants required access to a mobile phone and needed to be available for the nine month study duration.
Of the 189 responders (35.0% response rate) to the patient survey, 19.6% (37/189) had used a diabetes app. App users were younger and in comparison to other forms of diabetes mellitus, users prominently had type 1 DM. The most favored feature of the app users was a glucose diary (87%, 32/37), and an insulin calculator was the most desirable function for a future app (46%, 17/37). In non-app users, the most desirable feature for a future app was a glucose diary (64.4%, 98/152). Of the 115 responders (40.2% response rate) to the HPs survey, 60.1% (68/113) had recommended a diabetes app. Diaries for blood glucose levels and carbohydrate counting were considered the most useful app features and the features HPs felt most confident to recommend. HPs were least confident in recommending insulin calculation apps.
ED is a failure to obtain/maintain penile erection sufficient for intercourse is more prevalent in men with diabetes and increases with age.  It is important to distinguish erectile failure from premature ejaculation, decreased libido and other problems as these have different causes and treatment. ED in diabetes is largely due to failure of vascular smooth muscle relaxation secondary to endothelial dysfunction and/or autonomic neuropathy.
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