The survey was piloted with the first 30 patients with an email addresses (chronological order of clinic visits). Responses were reviewed after response rate reached 50%. As 4 questions were unanswered by some participants, a “none of the above” option was added. The invitations were sent out to the remaining 540 participants. A further 31 participants were excluded (4 email address errors, 13 gestational diabetes, 10 deceased, 4 did not have diabetes) resulting in a final total of 539 participants. This survey remained open for 3 weeks, with reminders sent to non-responders at one week and two weeks.

Having a healthy lifestyle includes daily physical activity which can prevent or delay Type 2 Diabetes. There are plenty of organised activities you can take part in such as Walk to Work, but you can also do your own thing and get moving with family and friends in any way you like. It’s most important to remember that activity is for life, not just one day. Regular physical activity could include walking, riding a bike, dancing or swimming.
Cost effectiveness as well as healthcare use was assessed during the study period compared with the nine months before randomisation (presented separately). We measured patient engagement and satisfaction with the intervention using semistructured interviews and data from the content management system. The secondary outcomes health related quality of life and perceived social support were not included in the initial trial registration but added before commencing the trial.
“There have been so many touching moments in the movement to Stop Diabetes since we launched last year,” commented Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “People have shared courageous stories of facing their diabetes head on, while others have shared their heart-breaking experiences of losing a loved one because of diabetes. The blog is a new way to raise our collective voices and tell people why we need to Stop Diabetes once and for all.”  
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This study shows app usage is relatively low among people with diabetes, while 60.2% of HPs have recommended an app to patients. There is, however, interest amongst people with diabetes and HPs to use diabetes apps, with strong interest in an insulin dose calculator. Apps with this feature have the potential to improve diabetes control. However, the critical problem of app safety remains a barrier to the prescription and use of insulin dose calculators. Further work is needed to ensure apps are safe and provided in a regulated environment. An app assessment process would provide HPs with confidence in the apps they recommend and would ultimately ensure app quality and safety for app users. At present, however, app users and HPs must remain cautious with diabetes apps, especially those in the insulin dose calculator category.
Your health professional at the Centre may suggest that they make a referral for you, if there are problems affecting your diabetes management or your overall health and management. Alternatively you can ask your family doctor or nurse to refer you. If you are uncertain about whether it would be helpful to see us, you are most welcome to phone us directly to discuss this. Phone 3640 860 ext 89113.
The survey was piloted with the first 30 patients with an email addresses (chronological order of clinic visits). Responses were reviewed after response rate reached 50%. As 4 questions were unanswered by some participants, a “none of the above” option was added. The invitations were sent out to the remaining 540 participants. A further 31 participants were excluded (4 email address errors, 13 gestational diabetes, 10 deceased, 4 did not have diabetes) resulting in a final total of 539 participants. This survey remained open for 3 weeks, with reminders sent to non-responders at one week and two weeks.
A total of 793 individuals were referred to the study and assessed for eligibility between June 2015 and November 2016. Of these, 366 were randomised to the intervention and control groups (n=183 each; fig 1). The final nine month follow-up assessments were completed in August 2017, with loss to follow-up (that is, no follow-up data on any outcome) low in both groups (overall 7/366=2%). A total of 12 participants (six per group) were excluded from the primary outcome analysis because of no follow-up HbA1c results after randomisation. Baseline characteristics of participants are presented in table 1, and no adverse events were recorded from the study or protocol deviations.
There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)
Today’s first post is titled “Why ‘Stop Diabetes’?” can be found at www.diabetesstopshere.org. This initial post seeks to explain why the Stop Diabetes movement was created and its goal for engaging the public.  “The goal of the Stop Diabetes movement is to grow to epic proportions, to be bigger than the disease itself,” the blog explains. “In short, it’s the answer to why the Association does the work that it does.”
We all have our favorite holiday activities. It might be watching fireworks on the 4th of July, heading to the beach for Labor Day, as summer winds down, or finding the perfect pumpkin to carve for Halloween. For many of us, it’s the non-stop activities that seem to begin with the Macy’s Day Parade, early Thanksgiving morning, and continue through the last bowl game on New Year’s Day. But, no matter what holiday or activity tops your list, you can bet that it involves not only extreme amounts of food and drink but the kind designed to send blood sugar levels through the roof. (more…)
Statistical analyses were performed by SAS version 9.4 (SAS Institute). All statistical tests were two sided at a 5% significance level. Analyses were performed on the principle of intention to treat, including all randomised participants who provided at least one valid measure on the primary outcome after randomisation. Demographics and baseline characteristics of all participants were first summarised by treatment group with descriptive statistics. No formal statistical tests were conducted at baseline, because any baseline imbalance observed between two groups could have occurred by chance with randomisation.
Nearly half of American adults have diabetes or prediabetes; more than 30 million adults and children have diabetes; and every 21 seconds, another individual is diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization whose mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The ADA drives discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, as well as to search for cures; raises voice to the urgency of the diabetes epidemic; and works to safeguard policies and programs that protect people with diabetes. In addition, the ADA supports people living with diabetes, those at risk of developing diabetes, and the health care professionals who serve them through information and programs that can improve health outcomes and quality of life. For more information, please call the ADA at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit diabetes.org. Information from both of these sources is available in English and Spanish. Find us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (@AmDiabetesAssn) and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn)
A total of 884 new patients aged <15 yr were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over the 20-year period covered by this study. There was an increase in the mean age at diagnosis from 7.6 yr in 1990/1 to 8.9 yr in 2008/9 (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.31, p = 0.009). This was observed in both males (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.22, p = 0.04) and females (0.06/yr, r2 = 0.13, p = 0.12).

The HPs’ survey was completed by 115 out of 286 HPs (40.2% response rate, 78 online, 37 paper). Table 6 shows the characteristics of responders. Almost all HPs (96.5%, 111/115) owned a mobile phone and of the 113 who answered, 60.2% (68/113) had recommended an app for diabetes management to a patient. Dieticians were most likely to have recommended an app (83%, 10/12), followed by nurses (66%, 42/64), (P=.006). There was no relationship between app recommendation and the number of years of treating diabetes (P=.48) or the responder’s age (P=.49).
Pedicures may seem like a modern indulgence, but they actually date back more than 4,000 years to the ancient Babylonians. The word pedicure comes from the Latin “pes” for foot and “cura” for care. Originally practiced to prevent foot problems, today, more popular than ever, pedicures combine nail and skin care with a relaxing and self-pampering experience enjoyed not only by women but more and more by men, also.   (more…)
The {Dario} device has been perfect, I love it. I love that it’s small and discreet enough. I can now test my sugars within 20 seconds, all from the bottom of my iPhone and no one around is none the wiser… I also love that it’s “all in one”. I’ve been using it now for around 4 – 5 months. The app is great at logging and motivation with its % scoring system.

The {Dario} device has been perfect, I love it. I love that it’s small and discreet enough. I can now test my sugars within 20 seconds, all from the bottom of my iPhone and no one around is none the wiser… I also love that it’s “all in one”. I’ve been using it now for around 4 – 5 months. The app is great at logging and motivation with its % scoring system.
-Keep your blood pressure under control. The same lifestyle changes that control blood glucose levels (dietary modifications and exercise) may also help you keep your blood pressure at safe levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes keep their blood pressure below 140/80, but check with your health care professional about what target is best for you.

It is well documented that any reduction in HbA1c is likely to be associated with a decrease in the risk of diabetic complications.38 Reductions in HbA1c are much more clinically important at higher levels, given that the association between vascular complications and HbA1c is non-linear and that similar reductions at lower HbA1c levels have much less effect.383940 In a less ethnically diverse population of people with type 2 diabetes who had levels of HbA1c higher than 6.5% (53 mmol/mol), a decrease of 1% (11 mmol/mol) has been found to result in reduced microvascular complications by 37%, myocardial infarction by 14%, and risk of death by 21%.38 A total of 75% of participants in the intervention group experienced a decrease in HbA1c at nine months, with a mean reduction in HbA1c of 8.9 mmol/mol (0.8%) from baseline, and a significant group difference of 4.2 mmol/mol (0.4%) in favour of the intervention. Therefore, the results in this study have potential to be clinically relevant in reducing the risk of vascular complications and death, although further investigation is needed.
Diabetes Depot carries a full line insulin pump supplies, including all major insulin infusions sets, insulin reservoirs and cartridges available in Canada, all at significant discounts below the manufacturer's list price. Our product line of diabetic supplies, required daily by people living with diabetes, include blood glucose meters, glucose test strips, lancets, insulin pen needles, insulin products, Dex-4 glucose tablets and Emla anesthetic cream. We also carry accessories such as pump clips, pump cases & pouches, prep pads, battery caps, diabetic socks, and helpful books on diabetes… everything an insulin pump user would require. Plus, because the Diabetes Depot is located within Stutt's Pharmacy, we also offer a complete prescription service.
Participants were referred to the study by healthcare professionals at their primary and secondary care centres across New Zealand. Additionally, participants could self refer to the study. Eligible participants were English speaking adults aged 16 years and over with poorly controlled type 1 or 2 diabetes (defined as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration ≥65 mmol/mol or 8% in the preceding nine months). The initial protocol required HbA1c concentration above the cutoff level within the past three months, but after feedback from patients and clinicians, this period was extended to nine months to ensure a greater reach across those people not having regular tests. Participants required access to a mobile phone and needed to be available for the nine month study duration.
Your health professional at the Centre may suggest that they make a referral for you, if there are problems affecting your diabetes management or your overall health and management. Alternatively you can ask your family doctor or nurse to refer you. If you are uncertain about whether it would be helpful to see us, you are most welcome to phone us directly to discuss this. Phone 3640 860 ext 89113.
In this large sample of people with diabetes attending a secondary care clinic in NZ, 19.6% (37/189) of patients reported using diabetes apps to support their self-management. Diabetes app users were younger and more often had T1DM. The most used app feature in current app users was a blood glucose diary (87%, 32/37). The most desirable feature of a future app was an insulin dose calculation function in app users (46%) and a blood glucose diary in non-app users (64.4%). A Scottish survey has reported similar results and observed that people with T1DM were more likely to desire insulin calculators in an app [23].

Additional data on all patients were collected from the hospital management system, including age, and the most recent values within the previous 12 months from date of survey for blood pressure (BP), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), urinary microalbumin to Creatinine ratio (ACR), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), and total cholesterol to HDL ratio (C:HDL). Prescription of lipid lowering drugs, anti-hypertensive drugs, insulin, or other hypoglycemic medication were also extracted from the medication list from the last visit within the sample period. Type of diabetes was self-reported in the survey (type 1 [T1DM], type 2 [T2DM], other or unknown) and in four participants who had selected ‘other’ or ‘unknown’ diabetes type was determined by examination of the clinical records. For categorization of participants by app use, 4 responders who did not indicate if they had a mobile phone or not were included in the non-app group.
A large patient sample size was obtained by contacting all patients seen in the last 12 months with an email address. The risk of overrepresentation by more technology-literate responders through recruitment via email was minimized by also recruiting via telephone and by providing paper surveys at the HPs’ conference. The demographic and clinical data of responders and non-responders were compared, and most variables showed no difference. Responders were actually older than non-responders and had better glycemic control. This study focused on the beliefs and opinions of people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers) rather than simply describing apps for diabetes . It is one of the first papers to describe app use in people with diabetes in New Zealand.

The control group also experienced a decrease in HbA1c from baseline to the nine month follow-up, and experienced improvements in secondary outcomes, which could indicate trial effects. Previous research has shown that recruitment to a clinical trial alone can result in improvements in HbA1c,43 but it is not expected that these improvements would be sustainable past the initial few months without intervention.
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