Increase your physical activity. Exercise is a very important tool to help lower your blood glucose. Prior to starting any exercise program, you will need to consult with your doctor. Make exercise routine with activities you enjoy. In addition to helping manage your blood glucose, exercise helps lower blood pressure and improves balance, flexibility and muscle strength. Exercise may even help to reduce anxiety and depression. Go out and play!
Diabetes Stops Here will provide snap shots of the people who are committed to putting an end to this disease, from inspiring volunteer stories to moving staff experiences to celebrity stories about how to be successful while living with diabetes. The stories, interviews and news will be shared by the blog’s author, a staff member at the American Diabetes Association, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for nearly ten years. 
Pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes are at epidemic proportions in New Zealand with the Auckland region over represented in certain populations. This programme works with those who have the highest rates of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes in Auckland creating that awareness and preventing diabetes where possible that is needed on a more intimate level within the community.
We are now operating as a Branch of Diabetes New Zealand; previously we had been in operation for more than 30 years, as an independent Incorporated Society. During that time, we have seen some significant changes in the field of diabetes. As times change, we strive to change with them, but our basic mission remains the same: to support the interests of people living with diabetes in the Rotorua region.
Lack of insulin results in ketoacidosis. Ketones are acids that develop in the blood and appear in the urine. Ketones could poison the body and this is a warning sign that the diabetes is out of control. Symptoms of diabetes involve nausea, shortness of breath, vomiting, fruity flavor in breath, dry mouth, and high glucose levels. Complications associated with diabetes are retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, heart disease and gangrene. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is yet another problem associated with diabetes mellitus. Symptoms include hunger, tremor, seizure, sweating, dizziness, jerks, tingling sensation and pale skin color. Improper management of diabetes causes low blood sugar, which in turn causes hypoglycemic coma. It is a life threatening condition.
A nine month, two arm, parallel, randomised controlled trial was conducted in adults with poorly controlled diabetes between June 2015 and August 2017. The study received ethical approval from the Health and Disability Ethics Committee (14/STH/162), and the protocol was published30 and registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614001232628). Trial development and reporting was guided by the CONSORT31 and CONSORT EHEALTH32 statements.
A total of 884 new patients aged <15 yr were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over the 20-year period covered by this study. There was an increase in the mean age at diagnosis from 7.6 yr in 1990/1 to 8.9 yr in 2008/9 (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.31, p = 0.009). This was observed in both males (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.22, p = 0.04) and females (0.06/yr, r2 = 0.13, p = 0.12).

Height and weight were recorded for 660 patients at their required first post-diagnostic clinic (on average 15 weeks from diagnosis) from 1994 onwards. Annual mean BMI SDS of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes did not alter (average non-significant change smaller than ±0.02 SDS/year) over the period for the entire population, or for any gender, age, or ethnicity sub-group. There was no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis.
The features most frequently used by current app users were blood glucose diaries (87%, 32/37), followed by carbohydrate/meal diaries (38%, 14/37) with 22% (8/37) reporting insulin dose calculation devices to be useful (Table 3). Table 3 demonstrates the features app users found useful in their current apps. App users reported the most desired feature for future use in an app was an insulin dose calculator (46%, 17/37; Table 4). Table 5 shows that non-app users reported insulin dose calculators to be the third most desired feature (54.6%, n=83/152). Blood glucose diaries were the most desired app feature amongst non-app users (64.4%, 98/152; Table 5). Non app users with T1DM were more likely to desire an insulin dose calculation device, than non-app users with T2DM, P=.01).
There were 884 new cases of type 1 diabetes, and age at diagnosis rose from 7.6 yr in 1990/1 to 8.9 yr in 2008/9 (r2 = 0.31, p = 0.009). There was a progressive increase in type 1 diabetes incidence among children <15 yr (p<0.0001), reaching 22.5 per 100,000 in 2009. However, the rise in incidence did not occur evenly among age groups, being 2.5-fold higher in older children (10–14 yr) than in the youngest group (0–4 yr). The incidence of new cases of type 1 diabetes was highest in New Zealand Europeans throughout the study period in all age groups (p<0.0001), but the rate of increase was similar in New Zealand Europeans and Non-Europeans. Type 1 diabetes incidence and average annual increase were similar in both sexes. There was no change in BMI SDS shortly after diagnosis, and no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis.

Pedicures may seem like a modern indulgence, but they actually date back more than 4,000 years to the ancient Babylonians. The word pedicure comes from the Latin “pes” for foot and “cura” for care. Originally practiced to prevent foot problems, today, more popular than ever, pedicures combine nail and skin care with a relaxing and self-pampering experience enjoyed not only by women but more and more by men, also.   (more…)


New Zealand celebrates Diabetes Action Month – and the results of last year’s risk factor assessment highlight the importance of getting involved: Last year, more than 3,500 people undertook an assessment of their risk factors during the month, with 68% learning they potentially have a greater propensity for type 2 diabetes. The core purpose of the first Diabetes Action Month was to alert New Zealand that everyone is at risk of diabetes. Activities in November included a national roadshow that visited 33 locations in 14 towns and cities, and the launch of an online version of the risk awareness tool, so everyone could assess their risk
The 1177 people with diabetes attending clinics at Capital and Coast District Health Board (CCDHB), Wellington, New Zealand over a 12-month period (10th September 2014 to 10th September 2015) were the sample population. Out of the total patients, 521 patients with an email address in the hospital management system were invited to participate via email. To include a representation of people without a recorded email address in the sample (n=656), every 5th person was telephoned (up to twice) and invited to provide an email address. Of the 131 patients telephoned, 54 (41.2%) were reached, of whom 49 (91%) agreed to participate. Patients without phone numbers or unable to provide an email address were excluded. This generated a sample population of 570 people.
There was a steady increase in the annual number of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in children <15 yr (r2 = 0.80; p<0.0001) of 2.0 additional cases per year, from 23 in 1990/1 to 60 cases per year in 2008/9. There was no appreciable difference in the rate of increase between males and females (p = 0.08), but the rise in number of new type 1 diabetes cases did not occur evenly among age groups (p = 0.0001). The yearly increase among older children (10–14 yr) was 3-fold greater than in the youngest (0–4 yr) group (0–4 yr = +0.4/yr; 5–9 yr = +0.8/yr; 10–14 yr = +1.2/yr). Over the 20-year period, new cases were moderately more frequent in winter and less frequent in spring (29.4% and 22.0%, respectively; test of equal proportions across all four seasons: p = 0.02).
HOME What is Diabetes What is diabetes? TYPE 1 DIABETES TYPE 2 DIABETES Get Tested for Diabetes Gestational Diabetes ARE YOU AT RISK? COMPLICATIONS YOUTH Resources for Youth #1 Pack and Jerry The Bear Study & Exams Type 1 diabetes newly diganosed packs LIVING WELL LIVING WELL WITH DIABETES Type 1 Diabetes Day to Day Management Type 2 Diabetes Day to Day Management Managing Diabetes Food and Nutrition ANNUAL DIABETES Check ups Travelling to New Zealand RESOURCES RESOURCES Take Control Toolkit Take Control Toolkit APP PAMPHLET ORDERING Diabetes Wellness Magazine Your Stories NEWS AND EVENTS Blog WHO ARE WE WHO IS DIABETES NZ Policies & Constitutions Diabetes NZ Awards Diabetes NZ Team CONTACT US Contact Info JOIN US PLEASE DONATE BRANCHES
×