We summarised the primary and secondary outcomes using descriptive statistics at each scheduled visit. A random effects mixed model was used to evaluate the effect of intervention on HbA1c at three, six, and nine months’ follow-up, adjusting for baseline HbA1c and stratification factors and accounting for repeated measures over time. Model adjusted mean differences in HbA1c between the two groups were estimated at each visit, by including an interaction term between treatment and month. Missing data on the primary outcome were taken into account in modelling based on the missing at random assumption. Both 95% confidence intervals and P values were reported. Treatment effects sizes were also compared between important subgroups considered in stratification, including diabetes type (1 and 2), ethnicity (Māori/Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific), and region (urban and rural). For other secondary outcomes measured at nine months, we used generalised linear regression models with same covariate adjustment using a link function appropriate to the distribution of outcomes. Model adjusted estimates on the treatment difference between the two groups at nine months were reported, together with 95% confidence intervals and P values. No imputation was considered on secondary outcomes.
The use of apps to record blood glucose was the most favored function in apps used by people with diabetes, with interest in insulin dose calculating function. HPs do not feel confident in recommending insulin dose calculators. There is an urgent need for an app assessment process to give confidence in the quality and safety of diabetes management apps to people with diabetes (potential app users) and HPs (potential app prescribers).
One of the most important aspects of diabetes management is to maintain a healthy body weight. Being overweight not only increases your risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers, it also makes your diabetes harder to manage. Small changes in your diet such as reducing your portion sizes and swapping to low-fat dairy products can help you to achieve a healthy body weight and manage your diabetes.

Participants could choose to receive blood glucose monitoring reminders to which they could reply by sending in their result by text message. They could then view their results graphically over time on a password protected website. If they were identified as not having access to the internet at baseline they were mailed their graphs once a month. All messages were delivered in English although the Māori version included keywords in Te Reo Māori and the Pacific version had keywords in either Samoan or Tongan dependent on ethnicity. Examples of SMS4BG messages can be seen in the box. Participants were able to select the timing of messages and reminders, and identify the names of their support people and motivations for incorporation into the messages. The duration of the programme was also tailored to individual preferences. At three and six months, participants received a message asking if they would like to continue the programme for an additional three months, and had the opportunity to reselect their modules receiving up to a maximum nine months of messages. Participants could stop their messages by texting the word “STOP” or put messages on hold by texting “HOLIDAY.”

Increase your physical activity. Exercise is a very important tool to help lower your blood glucose. Prior to starting any exercise program, you will need to consult with your doctor. Make exercise routine with activities you enjoy. In addition to helping manage your blood glucose, exercise helps lower blood pressure and improves balance, flexibility and muscle strength. Exercise may even help to reduce anxiety and depression. Go out and play!
The control group also experienced a decrease in HbA1c from baseline to the nine month follow-up, and experienced improvements in secondary outcomes, which could indicate trial effects. Previous research has shown that recruitment to a clinical trial alone can result in improvements in HbA1c,43 but it is not expected that these improvements would be sustainable past the initial few months without intervention.
Type 2 Diabetes is one of the major consequences of the obesity epidemic and according to Diabetes New Zealand is New Zealand’s fastest-growing health crisis. In terms of diabetes diagnosis, Type 2 currently accounts for around 90% of all cases. Also of concern to health professionals is that there are large numbers of people with silent, undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes which may be damaging their bodies. An estimated 258,000 New Zealanders are estimated to have some form of diabetes, with than number doubling over the past decade.
Before my type1 insulin dependent diagnosis, I had a pancreas that worked, going out for dinner was ...really exciting. I didn’t even know what type one autoimmune disease was. Id pick whatever I wanted from the menu. Didn’t think of my blood sugars at all! Sitting at the table and I would drink my drink without a thought of what it will be doing when the drink rushes into my blood stream. I wouldn’t be calculating in my head if carbs totals and portion sizes are going to bring me into hyper or hypoglycaemia . I wouldn’t be hoping that the exercise id just done before going to the restaurant will change my blood glucose reading....Now....my pancreas hasn’t worked for 11years and while everyone’s chatting away at the table I’m half there in mind and half of me is not living in the moment of enjoying myself because I’m caught up in the complete intensity of trying to deal with my type one condition. Very overwhelming and my mind plays a 🤹‍♂️ juggling game where One ball is exercise, one ball is long and Quick acting insulin and one ball is carbs/food portion. Also, my will power either is good or it’s shocking. The others get their big portions while I’m still at bg testing stage and haven’t injected for the meal yet!! Everyone is trying each others food next to me and across the table. I have invisible blinkers on my eyes so I’m not aware of food sharing that’s going on. Once my food arrived it’s then that I can calculate how many units of my insulin that I inject depending on how many carbohydrates in the meal , making sure I inject in a different area to my lunchtime injection. Finally I begin to eat and the other people are almost finished their meal!!! I am a type one hero in more ways than one. See More

Phoenix Health Centre carries out pre employment medical assessments for several large employers in Whakatane. These give a base line recording of an employee’s health status at the time they were employed. It is then possible to monitor the employee’s health in relation to the hazards they may be exposed to in the workplace. If required we also undertake monitored urine sampling for ESR drug testing.
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