‘I was very pleased to contact your service. I was feeling overwhelmed with my current situation however knew that I needed to get a diabetes test done. While I was waiting for my turn to be tested Susan welcomed me, helped my overwhelming feelings calm down, she was very approachable and understanding. Sandy followed through by assisting me with assurance that things were going to be okay and was very understanding. She encouraged that I seek more medical advice for my blood pressure results. She phoned my manager and found me a local GP that I could visit right away. I was very appreciative of these ladies and all the help, care and advice they gave me. Thank you so much!’

A total of 884 new patients aged <15 yr were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over the 20-year period covered by this study. There was an increase in the mean age at diagnosis from 7.6 yr in 1990/1 to 8.9 yr in 2008/9 (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.31, p = 0.009). This was observed in both males (0.07/yr, r2 = 0.22, p = 0.04) and females (0.06/yr, r2 = 0.13, p = 0.12).
Only children aged <15 yr were included. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed based on clinical features. All patients had elevated blood glucose at presentation: either a random measurement of ≥11.1 mmol/l and presence of classical symptoms, or fasting blood glucose ≥7.1 mmol/l. In addition, all patients met at least one of the following criteria: a) diabetic ketoacidosis; b) presence of at least two type 1 diabetes antibodies (to glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, islet cell, or insulin autoantibodies); or c) ongoing requirement for insulin therapy. Clinical and demographic data were prospectively recorded on all patients at each outpatient visit.

This study shows app usage is relatively low among people with diabetes, while 60.2% of HPs have recommended an app to patients. There is, however, interest amongst people with diabetes and HPs to use diabetes apps, with strong interest in an insulin dose calculator. Apps with this feature have the potential to improve diabetes control. However, the critical problem of app safety remains a barrier to the prescription and use of insulin dose calculators. Further work is needed to ensure apps are safe and provided in a regulated environment. An app assessment process would provide HPs with confidence in the apps they recommend and would ultimately ensure app quality and safety for app users. At present, however, app users and HPs must remain cautious with diabetes apps, especially those in the insulin dose calculator category.
Your health professional at the Centre may suggest that they make a referral for you, if there are problems affecting your diabetes management or your overall health and management. Alternatively you can ask your family doctor or nurse to refer you. If you are uncertain about whether it would be helpful to see us, you are most welcome to phone us directly to discuss this. Phone 3640 860 ext 89113.
Another goal of this blog is to give you a behind-the-scenes look at what the Association does on a daily basis to fulfill its mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people living with diabetes.  Our staff’s dedication – combined the stories that provide them with inspiration through the day – is a critical part of the Stop Diabetes movement.
The flexibility of mobile phones and their adoption into everyday life mean that they are an ideal tool in supporting people with diabetes whose condition needs constant management. Mobile phones, which have been used effectively to support diabetes management,13141516 offer an ideal avenue for providing care at the patient’s desired intensity. Additionally, they can provide effective methods of support to patients in rural and remote locations where access to healthcare providers can be limited.1718 Although there is growing support for the use of mobile health (mHealth) in diabetes, there is increasing evidence of a digital divide, with lower use of some technologies in specific population groups.1920 These groups include people who have low health literacy,21 have low income,222324 and are members of ethnic minorities.2526 Contributing factors include low technology literacy, mismatch between individual needs and the available tools, lack of local information, cost, literacy and language barriers, and lack of cultural appropriateness.27 For mHealth tools to be used to manage poor diabetes control, they need to be designed to the needs and preferences of those people who need the greatest support by considering these factors.
Only children aged <15 yr were included. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed based on clinical features. All patients had elevated blood glucose at presentation: either a random measurement of ≥11.1 mmol/l and presence of classical symptoms, or fasting blood glucose ≥7.1 mmol/l. In addition, all patients met at least one of the following criteria: a) diabetic ketoacidosis; b) presence of at least two type 1 diabetes antibodies (to glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, islet cell, or insulin autoantibodies); or c) ongoing requirement for insulin therapy. Clinical and demographic data were prospectively recorded on all patients at each outpatient visit.
A nine month, two arm, parallel, randomised controlled trial was conducted in adults with poorly controlled diabetes between June 2015 and August 2017. The study received ethical approval from the Health and Disability Ethics Committee (14/STH/162), and the protocol was published30 and registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614001232628). Trial development and reporting was guided by the CONSORT31 and CONSORT EHEALTH32 statements.

We are now operating as a Branch of Diabetes New Zealand; previously we had been in operation for more than 30 years, as an independent Incorporated Society. During that time, we have seen some significant changes in the field of diabetes. As times change, we strive to change with them, but our basic mission remains the same: to support the interests of people living with diabetes in the Rotorua region.
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