New Zealand celebrates Diabetes Action Month – and the results of last year’s risk factor assessment highlight the importance of getting involved: Last year, more than 3,500 people undertook an assessment of their risk factors during the month, with 68% learning they potentially have a greater propensity for type 2 diabetes. The core purpose of the first Diabetes Action Month was to alert New Zealand that everyone is at risk of diabetes. Activities in November included a national roadshow that visited 33 locations in 14 towns and cities, and the launch of an online version of the risk awareness tool, so everyone could assess their risk


Pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes are at epidemic proportions in New Zealand with the Auckland region over represented in certain populations. This programme works with those who have the highest rates of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes in Auckland creating that awareness and preventing diabetes where possible that is needed on a more intimate level within the community.
Pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes are at epidemic proportions in New Zealand with the Auckland region over represented in certain populations. This programme works with those who have the highest rates of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes in Auckland creating that awareness and preventing diabetes where possible that is needed on a more intimate level within the community.

Only children aged <15 yr were included. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed based on clinical features. All patients had elevated blood glucose at presentation: either a random measurement of ≥11.1 mmol/l and presence of classical symptoms, or fasting blood glucose ≥7.1 mmol/l. In addition, all patients met at least one of the following criteria: a) diabetic ketoacidosis; b) presence of at least two type 1 diabetes antibodies (to glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, islet cell, or insulin autoantibodies); or c) ongoing requirement for insulin therapy. Clinical and demographic data were prospectively recorded on all patients at each outpatient visit.
‘I was very pleased to contact your service. I was feeling overwhelmed with my current situation however knew that I needed to get a diabetes test done. While I was waiting for my turn to be tested Susan welcomed me, helped my overwhelming feelings calm down, she was very approachable and understanding. Sandy followed through by assisting me with assurance that things were going to be okay and was very understanding. She encouraged that I seek more medical advice for my blood pressure results. She phoned my manager and found me a local GP that I could visit right away. I was very appreciative of these ladies and all the help, care and advice they gave me. Thank you so much!’

Of mobile phone owners, those using diabetes apps were more likely to have T1DM (30/96) than T2DM (n=7/61); (P=.006). App users were younger with a mean age of 39.0 years (SD 11.1) compared to non-app users having a mean of 52.5 years (SD 15.6), (P<.001). There were no other significant differences in clinical variables between app and non-app users.

Nearly half of American adults have diabetes or prediabetes; more than 30 million adults and children have diabetes; and every 21 seconds, another individual is diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization whose mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The ADA drives discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, as well as to search for cures; raises voice to the urgency of the diabetes epidemic; and works to safeguard policies and programs that protect people with diabetes. In addition, the ADA supports people living with diabetes, those at risk of developing diabetes, and the health care professionals who serve them through information and programs that can improve health outcomes and quality of life. For more information, please call the ADA at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit diabetes.org. Information from both of these sources is available in English and Spanish. Find us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (@AmDiabetesAssn) and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn)
There are over 30 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, even if nearly a quarter of them have not been diagnosed. 13 million individuals in the U.S. have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence, and it is believed that the percentage of undiagnosed incontinence is likely to be significant. Diabetes is a disease, while incontinence is a symptom related to lifestyle choices, physical issues or an underlying medical condition. Urinary incontinence is often linked to diabetes because diabetes is one of the more common medical conditions that contribute to incontinence. (more…)
Before my type1 insulin dependent diagnosis, I had a pancreas that worked, going out for dinner was ...really exciting. I didn’t even know what type one autoimmune disease was. Id pick whatever I wanted from the menu. Didn’t think of my blood sugars at all! Sitting at the table and I would drink my drink without a thought of what it will be doing when the drink rushes into my blood stream. I wouldn’t be calculating in my head if carbs totals and portion sizes are going to bring me into hyper or hypoglycaemia . I wouldn’t be hoping that the exercise id just done before going to the restaurant will change my blood glucose reading....Now....my pancreas hasn’t worked for 11years and while everyone’s chatting away at the table I’m half there in mind and half of me is not living in the moment of enjoying myself because I’m caught up in the complete intensity of trying to deal with my type one condition. Very overwhelming and my mind plays a 🤹‍♂️ juggling game where One ball is exercise, one ball is long and Quick acting insulin and one ball is carbs/food portion. Also, my will power either is good or it’s shocking. The others get their big portions while I’m still at bg testing stage and haven’t injected for the meal yet!! Everyone is trying each others food next to me and across the table. I have invisible blinkers on my eyes so I’m not aware of food sharing that’s going on. Once my food arrived it’s then that I can calculate how many units of my insulin that I inject depending on how many carbohydrates in the meal , making sure I inject in a different area to my lunchtime injection. Finally I begin to eat and the other people are almost finished their meal!!! I am a type one hero in more ways than one. See More
Clinical psychologists have studied psychology at University, usually for at least seven years. They have specialised in learning about how the feelings, actions, beliefs, experiences and culture of people affect the way they live. They have learned how to listen to and understand people’s emotional and psychological problems and how to help people make changes in their lives.

There was a steady increase in the annual number of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in children <15 yr (r2 = 0.80; p<0.0001) of 2.0 additional cases per year, from 23 in 1990/1 to 60 cases per year in 2008/9. There was no appreciable difference in the rate of increase between males and females (p = 0.08), but the rise in number of new type 1 diabetes cases did not occur evenly among age groups (p = 0.0001). The yearly increase among older children (10–14 yr) was 3-fold greater than in the youngest (0–4 yr) group (0–4 yr = +0.4/yr; 5–9 yr = +0.8/yr; 10–14 yr = +1.2/yr). Over the 20-year period, new cases were moderately more frequent in winter and less frequent in spring (29.4% and 22.0%, respectively; test of equal proportions across all four seasons: p = 0.02).
In the U.S., there are nearly 26 million people living with diabetes, and more seniors have diabetes than any other age group. Currently, one in four Americans (10.9 million, or 26.9 percent) over the age of 60 is living with diabetes. With age comes an increased risk for specific complications that require diligence and care to properly mitigate them.
The growing prevalence of diabetes is considered to be one of the biggest global health issues.1 People of ethnic minorities, including Pacific and Māori (New Zealand indigenous population) groups, are particularly vulnerable to the development of diabetes, experience poorer control, and increased rates of complications.23456 In New Zealand, 29% of patients with diabetes were found to have HbA1c levels indicative of poor control (≥65 mmol/mol or 8%), putting them at risk for the development of debilitating and costly complications.7 Diabetes complications can be prevented or delayed with good blood glucose control, which is not only advantageous for a person’s quality of life but also will substantially reduce healthcare costs associated with treating or managing the complications.89101112
The majority of responders were not using diabetes apps (80.4%, 152/189), although 60.5% (89/147) reported they would be interested in trying one. Of the 118 people who answered the question, the reasons for not using an app was not knowing they existed (66.9%, 79/118), feeling confident without one (16.9%, 20/118), discontinued use after having used an app previously 16.9% (20/118).
We thank the participants who took part in this study as well as the staff at the primary care practices and diabetes clinics across New Zealand who referred their patients to the study; the National Institute for Health Innovation’s IT team for their work on the text message delivery system, and all those involved in the study design and set up; Coral Skipper, Louise Elia, Erana Poulsen, and Hamish Johnstone (Māori Advisory Group members); Aumea Herman (Pacific adviser); Joanna Naylor and Michelle Garrett (content development advisers); Richard Edlin (health economist); Mahalah Ensor (assistance with recruitment); Hannah Bartley, Rachel Sullivan, Anne Duncan, and Gillian Lockhart (research assistants); Michelle Jenkins and John Faatui (data management support); and Karen Carter and Angela Wadham (project management support).
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