Results The reduction in HbA1c at nine months was significantly greater in the intervention group (mean −8.85 mmol/mol (standard deviation 14.84)) than in the control group (−3.96 mmol/mol (17.02); adjusted mean difference −4.23 (95% confidence interval −7.30 to −1.15), P=0.007). Of 21 secondary outcomes, only four showed statistically significant improvements in favour of the intervention group at nine months. Significant improvements were seen for foot care behaviour (adjusted mean difference 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.29), P<0.001), overall diabetes support (0.26 (0.03 to 0.50), P=0.03), health status on the EQ-5D visual analogue scale (4.38 (0.44 to 8.33), P=0.03), and perceptions of illness identity (−0.54 (−1.04 to −0.03), P=0.04). High levels of satisfaction with SMS4BG were found, with 161 (95%) of 169 participants reporting it to be useful, and 164 (97%) willing to recommend the programme to other people with diabetes.
Of the 189 responders (35.0% response rate) to the patient survey, 19.6% (37/189) had used a diabetes app. App users were younger and in comparison to other forms of diabetes mellitus, users prominently had type 1 DM. The most favored feature of the app users was a glucose diary (87%, 32/37), and an insulin calculator was the most desirable function for a future app (46%, 17/37). In non-app users, the most desirable feature for a future app was a glucose diary (64.4%, 98/152). Of the 115 responders (40.2% response rate) to the HPs survey, 60.1% (68/113) had recommended a diabetes app. Diaries for blood glucose levels and carbohydrate counting were considered the most useful app features and the features HPs felt most confident to recommend. HPs were least confident in recommending insulin calculation apps.

The majority of responders were not using diabetes apps (80.4%, 152/189), although 60.5% (89/147) reported they would be interested in trying one. Of the 118 people who answered the question, the reasons for not using an app was not knowing they existed (66.9%, 79/118), feeling confident without one (16.9%, 20/118), discontinued use after having used an app previously 16.9% (20/118).
Owing to individual tailoring, participants in the intervention group received varying numbers of messages. Half the participants (92/183) received messages for three months, an additional 18% (33/183) chose to continue the messages for six months, and the remaining 32% (58/183) chose to continue the messages to the maximum nine months. Only three participants chose to stop their messages early. A total number of 76 523 messages were sent by the system to participants (median number of messages per participant 242 (interquartile range 122-511; range 14-2050)), and 16 251 messages of blood glucose results were sent into the system by participants receiving the reminders (68 (1-169; 0-917)).
The message delivery was managed by our content management system, with messages sent and received through a gateway company to allow for participants to be registered with any mobile network. Sending and receiving messages was free for participants. The system maintained logs of all outgoing and incoming messages. Further details of the intervention can be seen in the published pilot study,28 and protocol.30
Your health professional at the Centre may suggest that they make a referral for you, if there are problems affecting your diabetes management or your overall health and management. Alternatively you can ask your family doctor or nurse to refer you. If you are uncertain about whether it would be helpful to see us, you are most welcome to phone us directly to discuss this. Phone 3640 860 ext 89113.
Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which is accompanied by high blood glucose levels. It is a result of improper functioning of the pancreas, which secretes the insulin hormone. Lack of insulin, result in ketoacidosis. Makhana or Fox nut is a sweet and sour seed, which is also known as Euryale ferox. These seeds contain starch and ten percent of protein. There is no supporting literature for its positive association with diabetes. Therapeutic effects of fox nut involve its strengthening of kidney. It also helps to relieve the dampness, associated with leucorrhoea. It also regulates hypertension or high blood pressure. It is also beneficial for individuals with impotence and arthritis. Fox nuts are effective for individuals with high risk of premature ageing. It is also known as gorgon nut, is also helpful.
Understanding how food affects blood sugar level and constantly monitoring it is a way of life for those with diabetes. This largely involves the balance between the amount of insulin currently in the body at any given time and how the foods we eat change that it. At center stage for this daily drama are carbohydrates. Knowing the difference between how the various types of carbohydrates are processed by the body is key to maintaining blood sugar levels. (more…)

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which is accompanied by high blood glucose levels. It is a result of improper functioning of the pancreas, which secretes the insulin hormone. Lack of insulin, result in ketoacidosis. Makhana or Fox nut is a sweet and sour seed, which is also known as Euryale ferox. These seeds contain starch and ten percent of protein. There is no supporting literature for its positive association with diabetes. Therapeutic effects of fox nut involve its strengthening of kidney. It also helps to relieve the dampness, associated with leucorrhoea. It also regulates hypertension or high blood pressure. It is also beneficial for individuals with impotence and arthritis. Fox nuts are effective for individuals with high risk of premature ageing. It is also known as gorgon nut, is also helpful.


I act as a care giver for my grandparents who both suffer from type 2 diabetes. This article is right on point with having to make changes to one’s diet to help control blood glucose and overall health such as heart disease as well as staying active and exercising. The two naturally go hand in hand, but many diabetics like my grandparents have foot complications with swelling and neuropathy, requiring proper fitting footwear that is hard to find if you don’t know where to look. I found this guide on shoes for diabetics that helps explain what they are and their importance, especially for diabetics. Hopefully others find it as helpful as I did when caring for those diagnosed with diabetes.

We saw no significant interaction between the treatment group and any of the prespecified subgroups: type 1 versus type 2 diabetes (P=0.82), non-Māori/non-Pacific versus Māori/Pacific ethnicity (P=0.60), high urban versus high rural/remote region (P=0.38). Adjusted mean differences on change in HbA1c from baseline to nine months for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were −5.75 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval −10.08 to −1.43, P=0.009) and −3.64 mmol/mol (−7.72 to 0.44, P=0.08), respectively. Adjusted mean differences for non-Māori/non-Pacific and Māori/Pacific people were −4.97 mmol/mol (−8.51 to −1.43, P=0.006) and −3.21 mmol/mol (−9.11 to 2.70, P=0.28), respectively. Adjusted mean differences for participants living in high urban and high rural/remote areas were −4.54 mmol/mol (−8.40 to −0.68, P=0.02) and −3.94 mmol/mol (−9.00 to 1.12, P=0.13), respectively (table 3).

In this large sample of people with diabetes attending a secondary care clinic in NZ, 19.6% (37/189) of patients reported using diabetes apps to support their self-management. Diabetes app users were younger and more often had T1DM. The most used app feature in current app users was a blood glucose diary (87%, 32/37). The most desirable feature of a future app was an insulin dose calculation function in app users (46%) and a blood glucose diary in non-app users (64.4%). A Scottish survey has reported similar results and observed that people with T1DM were more likely to desire insulin calculators in an app [23].
Pedicures may seem like a modern indulgence, but they actually date back more than 4,000 years to the ancient Babylonians. The word pedicure comes from the Latin “pes” for foot and “cura” for care. Originally practiced to prevent foot problems, today, more popular than ever, pedicures combine nail and skin care with a relaxing and self-pampering experience enjoyed not only by women but more and more by men, also.   (more…)
-Keep your cholesterol levels in normal range. The liver makes cholesterol and it is also found in the foods we eat such as eggs, meats and dairy products. High cholesterol levels can clog your arteries and put you at risk of developing heart disease and stroke. If you have high cholesterol, you can help lower it by losing weight, exercising and eating a healthful diet.
The good news is that there are things you can do to prevent these diabetes-related problems, no matter your age. Taking action now will help with your later years, so you can live a healthy life and see your grandchildren grow into beautiful and healthy men and women. And, it’s the perfect time to think about this because National Grandparents Day is on Sunday.

To assess whether changes in incidence were more marked in certain age groups (as observed overseas [3], [4]), patients were also categorised into three bands according to age at diagnosis: 0–4 yr (children less than 5 yr), 5–9 yr (equal or greater than 5 yr but less than 10 yr), and 10–14 yr (equal or greater than 10 yr but less than 15 yr). These age bands also match national census classifications. The incidence of type 1 diabetes was assessed as the number of new diagnoses per 100,000 age-matched inhabitants on a given year, based on the 5-yearly national census data from Statistics New Zealand [12] and interpolated estimates of the population for the intervening years. Incidence was modelled using the Poisson distribution. Point estimates were calculated with exact Poisson confidence limits, and change in incidence over time were analysed using Poisson regression. Changes in patient numbers, age at diagnosis, and anthropometric data over time were assessed by linear regression. Poisson modelling was undertaken using StatsDirect v2.7.8 (StatsDirect Ltd, UK); other analyses were undertaken using JMP v. 5.1 (SAS Inc, USA).
The main effect of the intervention on secondary outcomes are presented in table 4. No significant differences were observed between the two groups for self efficacy (SEDM). A significant improvement in foot care behaviour was seen in the intervention group compared with the control group (adjusted mean difference 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.40 to 1.29), P<0.001) but no significant group differences were observed for diet (general or specific), exercise, blood glucose testing, and smoking behaviours (SDSCA). No significant group differences were observed for diabetes distress (DDS2).
The {Dario} device has been perfect, I love it. I love that it’s small and discreet enough. I can now test my sugars within 20 seconds, all from the bottom of my iPhone and no one around is none the wiser… I also love that it’s “all in one”. I’ve been using it now for around 4 – 5 months. The app is great at logging and motivation with its % scoring system.
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